Low Pass Bell Q question!

Discussion in 'Production' started by CH3SH, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. CH3SH

    CH3SH CH3SH - Naphalm Audio

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    Okays so its all about headroom yeah,
    When im lowpassing drums individually
    I usually use a very steep drop (Waves - Q-1.41)
    But i find that this can kill alot of the bottom end of the sound

    So i was just wondering if people steeply drop or slope it steadily?
    Thanx in advance ;)
     
  2. logikz

    logikz I Am Not The King Staff Member

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    roll it off in a long even slope, the steep cuts sound wrong to me most of the time
     
  3. richie_stix

    richie_stix gomby plz

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    no hard and fast rule, it depends on each case... but yeah, what logikz said (y)
     
  4. H*product

    H*product Heavyweight product

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    i gennerally use a waves eq with all three bands set to hpf. then adjust the top band dependant on the sound. use your ears and a analyser take out as much of the sound as possible before it becomes obvious to your ears.

    something worth mentioning is the reason people generally hi and low cut is to make room for other parts of the track, somthing i've noticed is cutting these frequencies can be detrimental if your mix doesn't have something else to fill the freq.
     
  5. CH3SH

    CH3SH CH3SH - Naphalm Audio

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    Yeah usually i use REQ EQ
    HP and LP whilst taking out resonant frequencies but -6
    And the serial the same EQ using ctrl & alt on the track mixer
    But i was just wondering how steep most people let the low end through
    I find if you make it very steep (which waves req eq does pretty well) it can kill alot of the low end of the sample
    Wether its to ear of statistical definition or not,
    I just need to stop being so damn clinical when im producing lol =]
     
  6. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    Because that's what you're doing with a steep slope.

    The good thing about using a steep slope is that you can be more clinical with where you want your cutoff I suppose. Leave everything down to a point but nothing below. This might be handy if your sample has some rogue low frequencies that you want to chop without affecting the rest. Or for highpassing a sub at 25hz without affecting the volume of your lowest notes.

    I'm only figuring things out as I go but I have learnt with kicks and snares that using a smoother slope to cut sub frequencies also nicks a lot of good frequencies from the weighty range just above that, so a steeper slope is better.


    A question: I assume that if you have a hpf with a 6db slope and you put two in series that would have the effect of a 12db slope? Or putting 5 in series = a 30db slope? Or is it something more exponential?
     
  7. groelle

    groelle Well-Known Member

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    depends on what you want to eq.

    with basslines i highpass with a very steep curve, with drums i tend not to cut tooo much of the lowend to preserve the punch, and with instruments i usually roll of..
    really depends, just use your ears imo.