Looking for MORE Ableton INFO

Discussion in 'Production' started by Krispy, Jan 7, 2010.

  1. Krispy

    Krispy Member

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    This thread is more directed towards any of the Ableton users. Basically I am just wondering if anyone has any good tutorial guides or websites they would like to share. I feel as though i've completely raided you-tube and am basically searching for more.

    If there was a special website that helped you out that maybe no one else knows about and you feel it should be shared with the world!

    Does anyone else out there try to produce Drum and Bass on Ableton besides myself? :wave:
     
  2. Protoplasym

    Protoplasym Nuskool

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    What basics have you learned and what do you feel you're lacking?


    The most amzing use of any Audio Sequencer that I feel most people don't take advantage of... is simply sequencing Audio in it.

    Don't worry about loading a drum sampler to make a drum riff... simply pull in a KD sample (and by sample, I mean a single hit) from somewhere and load it into Track 1, then pull a SD into Track 2, hats into 3-5, and other misc Percussive noises into 6-12.

    Start sequencing.
    You'll be amazed at the amount of flexibility you can have simply by sequencing a bunch of audio clips.

    Using the different Timestretch Modes, different quantizations, and the millions of chops/edits one can do - you can go very far using this method alone.

    Once you've got some riffs made... render them out... pull them back in into a blank slate (blank arrangement)... repeat the process by adding even more layers.. OR.. by that time, pull in some VSTis and have a bloody ball!


    :D
     
  3. Krispy

    Krispy Member

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    I feel that I am lacking the ability to take my production to the next level. I can get some basic drum loops going but it just seems like whenever I throw in some bass it just kind of ends for me and I don't really know what to do next. I'm having trouble creating build-ups and clip editing. Also, I will create some cool bass sounds etc. in massive but I am having trouble editing my recordings.

    I'm not really looking for anything too specific, just more general knowledge to give me some more ideas.

    I've never tried to sequence in that method you suggest actually but it sounds really promising. I've always just loaded all my drum samples into the impulse drum machine and gone from there. I suppose by separating them like that it would allow me to add more individual effects onto each aspect of my drum rack.

    DO you have any suggestions for creating buildups? I mean, after the intro and into the first breakdown... How long? What effects to use? Hmm.....

    ALso, i've been using this certain website as a basic template to help me along the way with the structure portion of the songs.
    http://www.djmandrick.com/html/djtutorials/understanding-dance-music.htm
     
  4. MattDMA

    MattDMA DnB Idiot

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    man you need to start looking at the ableton instruments... analogue, tension, simpler etc to tweak your sounds, make your own etc...
    and as protoplasym said, get yourself some single hits, switch views from the session view to the arrangment view and slap down your hits in any way u like to crate the rhythm u want by stretching the time line to open more beat markers... its an absolut peice of piss to draw upp your beats n shizz with
     
  5. TongueFlap

    TongueFlap Flappin'

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    the drum sampler is good. ^^
     
  6. druu

    druu Member

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    Ableton I found was a more hands on approach for production, even in Arrangement view. I was previously recording all my drum patterns using Drum Racks and midi (each 'pad' can be processed individually) and worked very well with 1/16 record quantize set, hammering out beats was a breeze, until I decided sequencing audio as Protoplasym suggested above. The hands on approach was fun but the versatility of working with audio just became the norm for me and I was able to somehow get a better sound, though it's probably more the fact that I'm gaining more experience with mixing. I use logic now though.

    But to the point, I think the OP was asking about arrangement more than anything? There's obviously many approaches to the arrangement of a track, but try something along the lines of; 32bar intro, 16bar breakdown, 32bar drop, 32bar breakdown, 32bar drop, 32bar outro. Something like that. Obviously you can chuck little fills and whatnot as you prefer but typically this is probably how most dance music goes, probably a more mainstream approach.

    Here's a good guide:

    http://www.tarekith.com/assets/arranging.html

    I don't personally use that method but I can see how it can improve arrangements.
     
  7. Solitude Beats

    Solitude Beats Member

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  8. Krispy

    Krispy Member

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    Alright, lemme get this straight

    SO instead of using the drum machine and having all my drum sounds in one track I would have each drum sound separated into its own track and make beats that way instead? That way I can edit and sequence each sample individually much more effectively.

    Am I on the right track here? I think I just repeated what you guys said but I think i'm catching what your throwing...

    I guess a drum rack could be used to initially determine what you want your drum rack to sound like and then separate them into their own separate tracks later.

    It really really seems like by having them all separated that I have the ability to modify them alot more and do more cool shit
     
  9. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    Yeah man. If you have all your drums on one track you'll be well limited.

    You're spot on, you can use your drum rack or sampler to edit single hits, but then render them to audio and assign them to one track each.
    Then group them into busses.
    Even if I'm layering kicks, I'll have each kick on a seperate track and bus them together. Same with snares.

    You'll give yourself way more control over each element.

    PS, I don't use Ableton, but this is just general thoughts on workflow.

    I have Battery3 which is a fairly good sampler, but I still prefer to (after doing any sample editing) render to audio and work with that.

    Million ways to skin a cat mind.
     
  10. Krispy

    Krispy Member

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    Yeah I suppose this thread kind of got sidetracked from Ableton information but still very useful nonetheless.

    Thanks for the good info, learned something new today
     
  11. moriaty

    moriaty Active Member

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  12. druu

    druu Member

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    Abletons Drum Racks assigns each drum hit to it's own channel anyway and of course you also have the main drum bus too. The only real difference between the two approches is one works with audio directly, the other wiu midi. So even if you stick to the drum racks approach, it's just as configurable given you know how to use it. Then workflow also comes into play...
     
  13. demonicdnb

    demonicdnb got duct-tape?

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    check out a guy on youtube called bboyspaz hes got some good stuff even if its basic it will get you going on a good workflow
     
  14. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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  15. demonicdnb

    demonicdnb got duct-tape?

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  16. vickvega

    vickvega Mr. Blonde

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    ask away bro- wot you wanna know
    i use abelton and im pretty familiar with it
    if your going to break down your drums into solo midi channels use a sampler
    you get more options and the same editing power
    dont hesitate to ask anything mang
     
  17. Krispy

    Krispy Member

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    Awesome, gonna add you to my friends in case I got any ableton specific questions in the future :wave:
     
  18. Protoplasym

    Protoplasym Nuskool

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    Try getting away from using VSTis for a session and see what you can come up with simply by sequencing Audio... I'm telling you, it's an amazing way to make music.

    A. What do you mean by "drum rack"? If by that, you mean the sounds your beats are made up of... then the answer is, not anymore than when you're using a Drum Sampler that allows the use of FX on individual channels... the same as you do in the individual channels in the sequencer.

    I'm saying... load up a blank template with nothing but 'AUDIO Channels' and sequence individual hits and see what you come up with. Do not use any 'MIDI Channels - i.e. VSTis'.

    B. You're simply going to have to practice at making edits... which imo.. is the easiest thing in the world of making music to do. It happens one of two ways, you either hear in your head how you want the edit to sound, then make it happen by shortening/lengthening clips (and the millions of combis of possible fx) or you have to edit your clips until something sounds cool/ideal.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010