'Looking' at a mixdown?

Solace

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#1
I'm not sure how I should put it in a short little sentence, so sorry if the title is a little weird...

So... What I've been doing lately for my productions is smack an ozone on the master en then put in in traktor (a dj/mixing program for the ones who don't know). And there you can see the wave form (I'll call it this, for the lack of a better word).

And now my question: Is it smart if I use this as a method to 'look' at my mixdown?
Since I use traktor for djing, I know how a general dnb track looks like, how the snare and kick stands out, how a big a bass looks in comparison with the rest of the track.
So when I drop a track of mine in there I look at my track and see if it resembles a professional track. If the snare also stands out, if the sub doesn't drown out everything...

Now is that a smart thing to do? Or should I better trust my ears more?


Little note: I do ofcourse listen to my mixdown first. This method is a little extra thing I do to check.
 

Solace

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#4
Yea ofcourse, like I said, I'm not using as a main tool to do my mixdowns with, I use it as a nice little extra.
Will check that vst! Thanks!
 

Sariscen

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#5
a good little VST is s(M)exoscope, it does what you're describing but you can put one on the master channel before ozone and one after, and see exactly what it's doing without going into traktor.
 

Riisu

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#6
I get what you're saying and yeah, it's another handy tool to see if you tracks match up against released stuff. Just don't get obsessed by it and use it in moderation along with any other tools you have.
 

Solace

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#7
Alright! That basically answers my question.. It won't hurt to use it (with moderation, which I'm doing, so all good)
Thanks guys!
 

Mania

i fukin wot m8
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#8
I find looking at analyzers to be extremely helpful to designing sound, but no so much when writing a tune. I have a bunch of analyzers up on my second monitor. Correlation meters, freq spectrums, waveforms, levels, everything you'd need really. When it comes to the technical aspect of making music theyre incredibly helpful, and analyzing your favourite tunes can give a sense of what certain sounds look like and i think its definitely good to have.

But from the creative perspective it doesnt add anything and can sometimes be a distraction even. I would say its one of those things that you you need to learn how to use, but also when to use it.
 
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