Logic Pro 9 Audio Processing

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dirty breaks

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#1
I really am finding Logic's inbuilt audio processing to be lacking when it comes to time-stretching audio, the audio quality after time-stretching seems to suffer noticeably and degrades and leaves noticeable audio artifacts, especially in comparison to using Elastic Audio in Pro-Tools (and in fact also the stock standard audio processing in Cockos Reaper). Does Anyone have any favoured settings in the preferences to combat this, or in fact is there a way of using a higher quality algorithm instead of the inbuilt one to get higher quality audio after manipulation?
 
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Riisu

Not the Preacher Man
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#3
Could be a few issues here.

You could be stretching the original audio too far which may cause some artifacts and effect quality. Also the original quality of the audio might not be up to standard - mp3's etc, just don't bother. Good quality well recorded 24-bit wavs handle well. Anything else can deteriorate badly and you don't get good results, from my experience.

Also depends what you're stretching, drum loops, pad samples etc...

That being said, monophonic flex time is a good shout for most things.

Really like Sound Toys 'Speed' algorithm, seems to be the best I've come across. But all being said, nothing really compares to Pro Tools elastic audio. Not tried Reaper so can't comment.

Hope that's some help.
 

T:M

Dusty Techno Workout
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#8
Could be a few issues here.

You could be stretching the original audio too far which may cause some artifacts and effect quality. Also the original quality of the audio might not be up to standard - mp3's etc, just don't bother. Good quality well recorded 24-bit wavs handle well. Anything else can deteriorate badly and you don't get good results, from my experience.

Also depends what you're stretching, drum loops, pad samples etc...

That being said, monophonic flex time is a good shout for most things.

Really like Sound Toys 'Speed' algorithm, seems to be the best I've come across. But all being said, nothing really compares to Pro Tools elastic audio. Not tried Reaper so can't comment.

Hope that's some help.
This

Also don't forget that in the side bar when using the flex tool there are a few extra options depending on which mode you are using (such as being able to switch on the percussive option in monophonic mode and complex mode in polyphonic). I've never really had any problem when using the flex tool.
 
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#9
Yea this is the one thing i havent liked about Logic so far. i'm probably just gonna stick to time stretching in Reaper it sounds so much better and is easy enough to bounce it out and put it into logic
 

lostnthesound

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#10
First off, Logic's time stretching is quite lovely and the best results are when the source audio file is as dry as possible. When time stretching is applied to a file that has FX or Reverb embedded, the results will never be as good, typically.

I keep the time stretching algorithm set to "complex," unless it's for any type of drums/percussion in which case I either "strip silence" to chop it up or use the "percussion" algorithm.

For the best results with time stretching a vocal, your best bet is to use flex time with the flex setting set to "monophonic." I typically do the following:

  • Place the audio file in logic.
  • Double click the region to open Logic's audio editor.
  • Go to file > detect transients.
  • I'll then use the +/- in the editor window to either add or subtract unnecessary transients, respectfully.
  • Return to the arrange window, select the track and region and activate flex time > monophonic.
  • Turn on the metronome (or your tune) and start shifting the transient points (markers) to the proper location. I find the best results are achieved by adjusting transient points that are located at the quietest parts of the wave form as opposed to the middle of a phrase. Also, the less transient markers you use to shift the vocals, the better the result.


Sidenote: You can use the "slicing" flex time option instead of monophonic if you're looking for more a chopped vocal sound a la Danny Byrd.

Also, if the vocal you're editing happens to have been "Acidised," make sure you disable "follow tempo" in the inspector panel. Logic doesn't play nicely with Acidised wav's for whatever reason.

Cheers.
 
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D

dirty breaks

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#11
Thanks guys, gonna properly read through this all later and have a sesh and try and sort it all out.
Gonna rep you all for the help too, it's much appreciated.
 

RUSSLA

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#13
First off, Logic's time stretching is quite lovely and the best results are when the source audio file is as dry as possible. When time stretching is applied to a file that has FX or Reverb embedded, the results will never be as good, typically.

I keep the time stretching algorithm set to "complex," unless it's for any type of drums/percussion in which case I either "strip silence" to chop it up or use the "percussion" algorithm.

For the best results with time stretching a vocal, your best bet is to use flex time with the flex setting set to "monophonic." I typically do the following:

  • Place the audio file in logic.
  • Double click the region to open Logic's audio editor.
  • Go to file > detect transients.
  • I'll then use the +/- in the editor window to either add or subtract unnecessary transients, respectfully.
  • Return to the arrange window, select the track and region and activate flex time > monophonic.
  • Turn on the metronome (or your tune) and start shifting the transient points (markers) to the proper location. I find the best results are achieved by adjusting transient points that are located at the quietest parts of the wave form as opposed to the middle of a phrase. Also, the less transient markers you use to shift the vocals, the better the result.


Sidenote: You can use the "slicing" flex time option instead of monophonic if you're looking for more a chopped vocal sound a la Danny Byrd.

Also, if the vocal you're editing happens to have been "Acidised," make sure you disable "follow tempo" in the inspector panel. Logic doesn't play nicely with Acidised wav's for whatever reason.

Cheers.
Legendary post!
 

lostnthesound

Burns Easily in the Sun
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#14
Cheers!

---------- Post added at 18:16 ---------- Previous post was at 18:07 ----------

You're in for a bad shock. You'll find out that mac is really a pc instead. Cheap sound card, same cpu, intel motherboard, same memory, same etc, etc.
Your comment has absolutely nothing to do with the original post. Furthermore, your argument has no legs to stand on, as comparing a Mac to the generic term "PC" is like comparing a BMW to the word "Car." To add, not all PC manufacturers outfit their computers with Intel processors on their motherboard, and any semi-serious producer knows better than to create music using an internal sound card–regardless what type of computer they're using.

To conclude, the generic nature of your comment, in addition to your shady signature links, means you're either a troll, a bot, or simply unintelligible.

Sorry for the hijack everyone.

Cheers.
 
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