Liquid style vocal samples

Blend 107

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#1
Hi,
Was wondering where abouts producers such as LSB, technicolour and komatic and lenzman find such brilliant vocal samples for their tunes.
I realise that they probably spend lots of time trying to find hem, and was really looking for somewhere to start searching.
Sorry if this thread is unnecessary, I tried searching on the forum but couldn't find much useful info.
Thanks :)
 

mr meh

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#3
Because labels have pro singers on their books to work with the producers, thats why you often see the same vocalists on dnb tunes (Diane Charlemagne for instance).
 

blend107

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#4
Because labels have pro singers on their books to work with the producers, thats why you often see the same vocalists on dnb tunes (Diane Charlemagne for instance).
Ah no, maybe I was confusing in my description, I don't mean featuring singers as such.
I mean something like the bloke talking at the start of this:


Or something like this at 1:10 :


Does that make more sense? It sound like these are sampled from something or another.
Cheers :)
 
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blend107

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#6
There are lots of sampling on dnb songs, you can trace it down to movies, etc.
Yeah, I realise that - I was asking about what the main sources are of sampled material are and whereabouts I could start looking to find samples such as those.
Surely these samples can't all be from films? I have tried sampling from films before and they often come with a lot of background noise making hard to use them in a track. Unless there's some way to remove this noise?
 

Saftstein

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#9
Hey man!

Most of the vocals in liquid tunes are originals. There are some good samples out there but most of them are overused or you can get copyright issues(like motown packs).

What you can do is, get a microphone & a sound interface and ask people that have a good voice if they wanna do a session. Believe me, there are a lot of excellent vocalists out there who are not well known and would be happy to do a studio session with you.

I recently tried a page called musicgateway. It's easy and i got like 10 requests from different vocalists within 2 days (And i don't even think my track was actually that good lel). Some of them charge a certain amount of money and others do it for a 50/50 split. And also on this page you have a huge amount of great vocalists.

I can just recommend that page, if anyone else has worked with it, i would love to hear your opinion :)
 

sonic72

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#10
Firstly, I'd forget about the Motown acappellas in circulation, they have been rinsed to death now.

Most DnB producers start out sampling records, and then when they get a name for themselves they use proper singers.
There's still a lot of mileage in sampling your own vocals, you just need to dig deep and keep your ears open at all times.

Sample spotting and crate diggging is a big part of some people's productions, you cannot expect vocals to just land on your lap, you have to do plenty of research, and look for artists/records you've probably not even heard of yet.

I have ammassed a wealth of acapellas and vocal snippets, it's taken me years and years to get what I have now, and there's many in my acapellas that have not been used yet, and many that have been used already.

It's usually just a few choice lines or phrases that get used, not the whole acapella, and you'll be suprised what goodness is hidden in the middle of crap tunes, so just listen to soul, funk, disco, rnb, house, old school etc and keep your ears open for vocals snippets and eventually you'll start realising which artists and labels are worth looking out for, and a lot of the good stuff is founf in places you would not expect..
 
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