Limiter

Discussion in 'Production' started by Dugg Funnie, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    What the fuck does it DO!!!??!!1!?!

    Seriously, I have no actual clue what a limiter does and when to use it.
     
  2. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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    It does what it says on the tin......It limits!

    Seriously tho, it limits the amount of audio signal going through the channel its on. So you can limit the audio to -3db for instance, but then play with the gain to bring the loudness back up without going over 0db and red lining!
     
  3. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    So, in a way it's like a brickwall compressor?
     
  4. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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  5. Attire

    Attire Last Winter

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    If you don't really know what it's doing, you're probably better off not using it haha.
     
  6. equilibrium

    equilibrium Member

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    Fabfilter limiter is great. Put it on the drum bus, look into the attack times and settings. Punchy, transparent, classic settings. Then you can use some boost to get fatter drums. A must if you ask me.
     
  7. ARTFX

    ARTFX www.artfx-studios.com

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    Yeah indeed really simple, you put it on a track, set the ceiling level to let's say 0dB and then everything that peaks over 0dB will be cut down. Then if you boost the gain you can bring the perceived loudness (RMS level) up without going over that 0dB mark.