kick and snare levels

Discussion in 'Production' started by Matthew-B, Dec 17, 2013.

  1. Matthew-B

    Matthew-B New Member

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    Hi

    What levels of kick and snare do you set? I heard that in drum and bass kick and snare should peak at same level. I like heavy kicks with quick attack and pitched up subtle (something like Mefjus sometimes uses) but it is very hard to me to set proper levels. If kick is the same level with snare, kick sounds too loud and is quite painful to ears, but when i make snare a little louder, than kick lose power.

    When i listen well mixed tune i see on spectrum that kick is quite loud sounds ok (not painful).

    Regards
     
  2. [unknown]

    [unknown] sublime stylee ;8

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    Imo the kick should be a bit more quiet than the snare, as the snare is the main rythmic component. just choose the right samples, give your kick a little boost between 100 and 200 hz and see how it sounds. also, automate. its rare that your drums are gonna sound good at the same level throughout an entire track. hope ive helped.
     
  3. Dark Lizardro

    Dark Lizardro The Lizard that has a hammer Staff Member

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    This really is something applied to taste, man. There are no rules of thumb. If the track you're doing requires a more prominent kick, then the kick should be louder than the snare. I personally tend to leave the kick at -2,5db (keep in mind that I do my mixing so my track peaks at -6db), and then level the snare according to taste. You should also not forget about the volume of ghost snares and other percussion, so they blend well on the mix.
     
  4. Mania

    Mania i fukin wot m8

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    The problem you are having is that you kick has a lot less dynamic range than your snare, which makes it sound louder.
    In that case, when your making snares and choosing samples, its really helpful to get you snare around the same RMS as the kick so you can play them in your break at the same (or slightly different) peak level.
    When it comes to choosing your level, it really depends on the style of the break. Some liquid and rollers have the kick obviously louder than a tight or tinny snare, while other more rhythmic breaks have the kick quiet in a fast shuffle, with the snare being loud, thick and driving the track forward.
     
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  5. Kopacetic

    Kopacetic Member

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    The kick has to be the loudest in the mix, so it can be noticeable in the mix. I usually have my snare bus about 1 or 2 decibels below the kick peak.
     
  6. Gloxxy

    Gloxxy I SNORT COAL

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    This is all dependent on what kind of track you are producing. If its straight up 2 step drum and bass then the snare will peak higher that the kick when you analyse the waveform.