irritating bass problem

Phat_Sam

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#1
ok... im trying to get my bassline as deep as i can possibly get it but for some reason its just not doin it the way i wanna.


im using 2 sines. 1 is 7 semitones above the first with a bp filter linked to an LFO

for a sub im just using a single sine an octave below the first 2

fairly basic yeah?


the problem im having is with the note changes. some notes being quieter than others when playing on my midi keyboard. the main problem is that the bassline ive written sounds good so i cant/wont change the melody. ive tried compressing the bass/maximizing the bass/selective EQing all to no avail!

anyone able to help with this?
 

kama

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#2
That could well be because of your room. Its how sound waves work in confined spaces. A certain frequency of sound has a wavelength that correlates to your room size and it cancels itself out in some points in the room, bouncing back from teh wall, like layering 2 sinewaves of opposite phase together. This is why you need to consider acoustic treatment in the room (bass trapping in this case or try moving the speakers/listening position around).

You can confirm this by listening to the bass with headphones, as obviously acoustics wont matter when using 'phones.
 
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Phat_Sam

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#3
i didnt know that. cheers kama. will give it a shot and shout back if it is a problem

---------- Post added at 19:16 ---------- Previous post was at 19:14 ----------

its a bit of both... theres still a massively stray frequency...


any other suggestions?
 

kama

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i didnt know that. cheers kama. will give it a shot and shout back if it is a problem

---------- Post added at 19:16 ---------- Previous post was at 19:14 ----------

its a bit of both... theres still a massively stray frequency...


any other suggestions?
check it with an analyzer as well?

The sine wave oscillators might be cancelling each other out at some points as well. Try with saw waves, maybe that will help a bit.

---------- Post added at 21:24 ---------- Previous post was at 21:24 ----------

Or try adjusting either oscillator up or down one octave.
 

Phat_Sam

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#6
well one of the sines was 7 semitones above the first so they couldnt have cancelled each other out could they?

have played around a bit more and have almost sorted it with some RIDICULOUSLY fine EQing.

thanks for your help Kama!
 

logikz

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#7
i think its to do with the higher notes always having more power than the lower, so change the velocity on the higher notes or put a compressor on there to even out the volume
 

Neomind

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#9
Also you could try resampling your bass. Get the loudest sounding note (WITHOUT THE LFO THING!) and I guess both separated, then after add the lfo and the bypass. That way you'll have a much more controled sound, because synths sometimes doesn't work as we spected (starting point of sound waves is one of their main problems).
 
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