I dont normally ask for help but......help!

Discussion in 'Production' started by Mr Fletch, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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    I hardly ever have a question any more regarding production. But I've been trying for a very long time to recreate these type of snares in my tracks. Now I know the usual drill....find the right samples, layer etc. But I'm almost sure that there is another technique involved that im missing to get them sounding like these in my examples. I can hear the reverb in there, which is a given with the type of dubstep I make, but the initial hit and timbre of them just eludes me!

    Anyway, heres a couple of examples





    I figured someone here might know what I'm missing? I've played with pitch, eq, layering, different samples etc, but I'm fighting a losing battle lol!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2015
  2. fluid.element

    fluid.element Member

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    almost doesn't sound like a snare drum at all, more like a wooden percussive instrument but I can't think exactly what, but if I had to try and make it I would try live sampling very thick wooden sticks being struck together.. I don't know for sure but hopefully I have helped you think a bit more into it :)
     
  3. miszt

    miszt BASSFACE Royale

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    Rim hit, sorted :) the EQ and compression on those is tight as fuck, careful with your attack settings, keep it sharp but without killing the transient and turning it into something else, so the compression should be just very very slightly longer than the transient of the hit, could be 0.1ms could be 1-4ms or more u'll have to deciede when u find a Rim you like

    if you run out of question on production, then u probly need push yourself more ;) theres more to learn about music than a single person can ever hope to know :D
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  4. Menosance

    Menosance aka OSOI

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    It not the usual snare. It sounds like a woodblock with a high hat placed on top. Now, the reverb is the usual setting for a dubstep track. Nothing different from the usual in the reverb department from what I'm hearing.
     
  5. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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    I didn't mean I don't have any questions because I'm not learning anything new, I just meant that nowadays I tend to self help, find my own answers etc, but on this occasion it had me beat lol!

    Compression is something I vaguely understand, but I'll be honest, you've done me with that sentence lol, I'm baffled.
     
  6. miszt

    miszt BASSFACE Royale

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    attack and decay are the same for compression as they are for synthesis, the attack refers to the build up from no sound to full sound

    give it a try, get a nice big snare and put loads of compression (1:5) on it with a very short attack, say 0.1ms, audition it and then up the attack to say 3ms and 5ms, you should notice the diffrence

    the longer the attack, the more of the original sound shape (transient) will come thru before the compression kicks in, its useful for eg to keep the punch of the sound, but heavily compress the tail and/or reverb

    this is something you should definitly learn and pracitce as much as you can, esp for dubstep and its Huge snares, compression is the key to getting the sound down, its important for kicks aswell, using very fast attacks on kicks leaves them lifeless and flabby, but uping the attack beyond the attack transient allows the initial punch to come thru while the compression kicks in after and keeps the sound big but in check

    gentle compression with the right attack and decay settings will do wonders, you can do it by ear, but for a start, I'd do it manually, load up your snare sample and use your DAW time makers to figure out how long the attack is, and how long the decay is, then alter them in your compressor to see how it affects the sound, eventually as your ears tune up you'll do it by ear with just little adjustments as you go along

    also worth noting that your ears have an inbuilt compressor, if you have been listening to loud music, you will find it harder to control the compressor properly, so its def a job to be done at low volume and with plenty of breaks
     
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