hum in my mixer

Discussion in 'Production' started by DjFr3ak, Dec 7, 2006.

  1. DjFr3ak

    DjFr3ak New Member

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    i've noticed lately my behrginger vmx300 mixer( about a year old) sends a hum over my pa when the gain and both channels and master are too high....but it's been happening around 4 db...(still in the safe zone)....likewise when i turn my pa up high i notice the hum as well.....any thoughts?
     
  2. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    I dont know where you live, but up here the direct current frequency is 50 hz from a wall socket. If you plug your mixer, synth or pc in a different socket than your PA, it produces a hum because the different sockets are "out of sync". Try connecting all devices in the audio signal path to the same outlet.

    Or it could simply be because your mixer is behringer. they're known to be dodgy. most of the time price and quality go hand in hand.
     
  3. Affliction

    Affliction thought size didnt matter

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    Are you sure you mixer is grounded?
     
  4. DjFr3ak

    DjFr3ak New Member

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    it happens prevelently with older records...also just out od curiousity.."ground wire fault" on my power strip. that means the circuit isn't grounded?
     
  5. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    yeah newer electric applications are all grounded, but if you live in an older house for example, the wall sockets might not be grounded. But if it happens on older rekkids, i think you simply oughta buy new needles. Vinyl wears.
     
  6. DjFr3ak

    DjFr3ak New Member

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    im rockin the sure m447's...they seem decent to me..not even a year old...whats the avg life of a semi good needle... here are the specs...


    "The choice for scratch!

    The Shure M44-7 Competition DJ Cartridge features extreme skip resistance, lowest record burn, ultrahigh output, and especially strong bass. The M44-7 turntable needle has a spherical stylus tip. 1.5-3 grams tracking range. 9.5mV output.

    Shure M44-7 Competition DJ Cartridge Features:

    Employs low-mass, high-output, moving magnet structure invented by Shure
    Comes with a user guide, mounting hardware, and stylus guard
    Full one-year warranty.
    Wide-diameter, high-strength stylus assemblies for dependable back-cueing
    Spherical diamond tips that ride gently over a large footprint in the record groove
    Cutaway grips for high visibility of the irradiant orange stylus tip
    Standard 1/2" mounts that fit all leading DJ turntables

    Got the itch to scratch, order today."
     
  7. Dustek

    Dustek Finished the PhD

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    Age has nothing to do with it, usage matters. You can check if its the needles easily, get a mate to bring his round.

    Your older records might be worn out but that wouldn't produce a hum.

    I'm pretty sure its the Behringer. They are pretty shite and wear out faster than a pair of Paris Hilton thongs.
     
  8. Bad Ace

    Bad Ace Close2Death

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    :word: prolly the problem
     
  9. DjFr3ak

    DjFr3ak New Member

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    ...Touché.... haha
     
  10. Noxxus

    Noxxus Master baiter

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    I was looking into all this at work today. If it's hum caused by connecting two audio devices which are on seperate phase - most houses have single-phase and many commercial/industrial buildings run on triple phase. running audio devices off seperate phases will cause this problem - what you would need to get round it is an isolation transformer.

    It probably isn't the case tho. Your probably picking up noise in your mains. Do you have long leads trailing around? they will pick up induction if so.