How to remove an unwanted noise?

Discussion in 'Production' started by AlienWeapon, Dec 17, 2013.

  1. AlienWeapon

    AlienWeapon Member

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    In a track of mine in one part my bass makes a kinda glitch/blip sort of noise. Basically my bass is a standard Reece which I have resampled numerous times and at that point no glitch. However when i put the sample into my project for chopping it up and rearranging one part of it glitches as it goes into the next. It's basically in the as one part meets another, they arent overlapping, however I have a suspicion its because I have one part reversed. I don't really want to take the reverse off, is there any work around for this or do I no choice but to remove the part?
    Here's the track so u know what I mean, its in the build up. http://soundcloud.com/8-bitheroes/alien-weapon-w-i-p

    Sent from my HTC Desire S using Tapatalk 2
     
  2. Sultanare

    Sultanare Active Member

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    If you're using FL you can open the sound in Edison, and then declick out/in. That usually fixes pops/clicks
     
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  3. Optimal Prime

    Optimal Prime Specialising in the arts and crafts of Drum & Bass

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    What you describe sounds like something that occurs at the overlapping point of two audio parts. Can't you quick fade the parts or even use two layers and force them to smoothly link together? You can often zoom right into an audio part and detect the click and cut it out then overlap the gap with quick fading. Plugins like the one mentioned above, and one I used to use (Waves X-Click) can remove clicks and pops. They will damage the audio if used aggressively. I've only used these in the past when a sample contains a lot of clicks.

    I very often use the multiple layers method to merge audio together for certain tasks.
     
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  4. AlienWeapon

    AlienWeapon Member

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    I tried using the delick on the out but it still clicks at the end of the sample. I also tried fading out slightly but that creates an awkward transition into the next sample.
    What do you mean by overlapping and quick fading?
     
  5. Dark Lizardro

    Dark Lizardro The Lizard that has a hammer Staff Member

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    wouldn't a surgical eq solve the problem? you know, locating the frequency that is clicking and with a very sharp Q remove it from the sound?
     
  6. AlienWeapon

    AlienWeapon Member

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    How would I go about doing that in fl?
     
  7. ThePapa

    ThePapa Suffragette City..

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    I would use threats of violence and if that doesn't work, a hammer.
     
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  8. Dark Lizardro

    Dark Lizardro The Lizard that has a hammer Staff Member

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    Assing a new instance of Parametric EQ2 to the mixer (where the synth or sample is already assigned). Then, grab one of the circled things (the ones with different colors and numbered from 1 to 7), and raise it. Now, with your mouse, scroll down, as this will make the Q (or the curve) gets pretty narrow, and using the controllers on the bottom-right corner, sweep it into the whole frequency spectrum.

    This way, you can locate those nasty frequencies, and, when you notice one, just stop there and lower the level of the parameter (or circled thing).
     
  9. oversight

    oversight Member

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    sounds really obvious but have you tried upping the attack on the second sound/ a slight fade in?
     
  10. AlienWeapon

    AlienWeapon Member

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    I will try both these suggestions tomorrow and let you know how I got on.
     
  11. MARKLAR

    MARKLAR International Tracksuit Salesman

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    if i ever get a clip click sound i just run the attack.lol
     
  12. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_crossing

    Speakers don't like going from no amplitude to some other amplitude with 0 time between, it's an attempt to slap physics in the face and physics don't take no bullshit.
     
  13. AlienWeapon

    AlienWeapon Member

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    well, i can say i tried to eq it out but no matter what i couldnt get rid of it lol. But what i did do was add a slight fade in and out and thats pretty much covered it up all but a tiny bit.
     
  14. Optimal Prime

    Optimal Prime Specialising in the arts and crafts of Drum & Bass

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    Surgical EQ isn't relevant for pops and clicks, that's useful when removing a specific tone at a particular frequency, such as a ringing in the same caused by leakage or some sort of mains hum that you can hear when compressing a raw sample.

    Referring back to the quick fading and overlapping I was talking about, this is simply a case of playing about with chopped up audio parts that are intended to be played as a single audio part, but using the fade handles you have at the front and end part of the sample to help gell them together better. Sometimes it's hard to do depending on the situation, but if I have a single click in there, it's often caused by a chop in a waveform that plays from one point and has to instantly switch to another point on the + and - spectrum. I use Cubase and it does allow for cutting at the 0 point, which is the centre, where no sound occurs, that way if you put two audio parts next to each other and they both attach together at the 0 point (flat line area of the wave middle), then there won't be any click. This isn't always succesfull though because the left and right waves often don't match perfectly, so you can still get clicks. What I do to counter this, is manually cut out the click and heal the gap by crossing over parts of the waveform, usually using a couple of tracks rather than using just the one audio track. Sometimes I'll even time stretch a tiny amount to fix the gap created by removing the click so that the position of the whole sound isn't being moved at all, but only that one small tiny section if being altered and the time stretching becomes unnoticed.

    Another thing as well, depending on what you hear in the mix as a whole, sometimes you can get away with subtle clicks simply because they are masked by the rest of the track. This is usually a problem during quiet more solo section of the track where it becomes exposed. But as I described above, it's a case of cutting out the click entirely if it's inside the audio permanently and then smoothing the gap, or the click is caused by the natural overlapping caused by chopping up and stitching together where these waveforms do not both cross as the same position on the waveform causing a sudden change in volume, so quick that it becomes audible as a click.
     
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