How to make my drums much larger than life when producing more minimal dnb

Discussion in 'Production' started by shaunlee0, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. shaunlee0

    shaunlee0 New Member

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    Hi there wondered if anyone had any tips to make my drums a bit bigger and heavier. Using logic but any general production advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. Eternaloptimist

    Eternaloptimist Active Member

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    start with good samples that need minimal polishing --- turd polish cant etc
     
  3. tv_g

    tv_g Active Member

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    Can you post up an example?

    I like minimal because you can really get obsessive over the timbres and movement of reverb. I'll often bus my delays and reverbs to separate channels to have more control on panning, eq or even resample and crossfade between two reverbs eq'd or filtered differently.
     
  4. spyre

    spyre sample all the things

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    Add a dash of distortion to the midrange freqs. Short reverb can help them sound 'bigger' also.
     
  5. RUSSLA

    RUSSLA DNBF Monarch

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    Seperate compression of individual hits can bring stuff to life, then send to bus with small parallel compression to glue them. Also stereo spread the high end of the bus to give extra fullness. Careful Sample delay can be used on hats too with minimal tunes to make it sound 'larger'
     
  6. ShirPan

    ShirPan Member

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  7. sam the dnb man

    sam the dnb man Variation

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    Check the phase correlation when using stereo effects. Especially with sample delay. Stick a phase correlation meter on your master to monitor it. Poor correlation will cause cancellations when played in mono.

    I use a combination of compression, limiting and subtle distortion. Is tick a short reverb on sends as well and apply it to various hits
     
  8. sam the dnb man

    sam the dnb man Variation

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    This isn't always necessary. Layering hits can actually cause small cancellations.
     
  9. ApeCat

    ApeCat Human Dubplate

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    Whenever I layer drum hits on top of eachother I pick out samples with different attributes and EQ out whatever overlap there might be to minimize cancellations.

    Then I usually add a little distortion to each hit, bus them together and add a little distortion to them all together, maybe a hint of reverb depending on the kind of instrument, sometimes one layer in the hit is given a little added processing; a subtle flanger or something for added movement.
     
  10. D-Jhepz

    D-Jhepz ◕‿◕

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    i dunno how much people will agree but i some times find that after you got a good hit, double it up then bounce
     
  11. alz

    alz compress to impress

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    distortion is the one, also there's some sample packs that have been put through tape, they're quite nicely saturated.

    layering drums with "real drum" samples is good too, sometimes i have some shitty live snares under quite processed ones.

    parallel compression.

    old hardcore records
     
  12. StrifeII

    StrifeII Member

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    Don't neglect the rest of the track or muddiness will have it sounding crap. sidechain your bass if you want an impacting kick. EQ the lows out of the reverbs you use.

    it really depends what you're after. I usually apply a little loudness using a multiband compressor, saturators etc tend to leave it sounding crap. and leave out anything that sounds generally light and fluffy like synth strings if you want it sounding deep and chunky - think about the track as a whole, not a single element.