How is the reese effect done?

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#1
I'm trying to find out how a particular effect on a reese type sound is created.
You hear it in allot of drum & bass tracks, here's an example.



The sound is at 1:32 minuets - it's that sliding, phasy type of effect on what I guess is a very short note of a reese.

Any help would be much appriciated.

Cheers!



EDIT: Just realised the title says 'the' instead of 'this'. Sorry about that.
 

Dark Lizardro

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#2
Reese basses are basically two saw waves detuned by a few cents, which causes phase cancellation between them and therefore you get the effect. Obviously, this is the most basic form of reese, there are countless forms of achieving this effect using different waves as well.
 

Lorre

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#3
Reese basses are basically two saw waves detuned by a few cents, which causes phase cancellation between them and therefore you get the effect. Obviously, this is the most basic form of reese, there are countless forms of achieving this effect using different waves as well.
He said:

I'm trying to find out how a particular effect on a reese type sound is created.
You hear it in allot of drum & bass tracks, here's an example.

EDIT: Just realised the title says 'the' instead of 'this'. Sorry about that.
 

Kesmusic

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#6
This may not be the kind of reese bass your looking for, but this tutorial by sub focus shows you how to make a great classic sounding reese similar to the one in his tune Last Jungle using NI Massive. Its one of those basses that sounds good on 90 percent of tunes and also a great staring block for making the more advanced reeses! - Just try and not get raging at the poor video quality like I did.

Here's the tutorial:



And hes a clip of Last Jungle:

https://soundcloud.com/interstellafragilistic%2Flast-jungle-original-mix

Hope this helps!
 

LG18

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#8
Hi, thanks for the sub focus video.

I've seen it before and have managed to make the classic Reese following that tutorial.

What I'm looking for now, is some form of modulation to a saw wave based reese to get the sound in the video I posted, any idea's?


Thanks.
 
Last edited:

smoothassilk

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#9
Have a look at some of the tutorials on the 'how to bassline' thread that's a sticky at the top of the production forum.

Working out exactly how a specific reece is made is usually very difficult because they usually involve long FX chains and lots of automation, so most producers just make loads of them until they find one like rather than aiming to replicate a specific sound.
 

JimpaDirt

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#10
What I'm looking for now, is some form of modulation to a saw wave based reese to get the sound in the video I posted, any idea's?
Are you looking for that sound that just appears for a millisecond around 1.32? It sounds like just the basic reece but with a lot of flanger or chorus added to it.
 

LG18

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#11
Thanks for the replies.

I've actually managed to do it from playing around.

The way I got it was through applying very quick pitch automation, one octave down.
 

LG18

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#13
That's long as fuck, use Portamento and adjust the glide time to get that effect with MIDI
Well yeah, that's essentially what I'm doing - just in the synth rather than in Logics arrange window.
Cyclop has a way of doing it that takes like, five seconds.

Thanks for the reply.
 

AyusDnb

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#14
I was about to say before I read you had solved it, that it is pitch modulation. I got to the point I could make a good reese but it was missing something. It was pitch modulation.
 
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#15
Well yeah, that's essentially what I'm doing - just in the synth rather than in Logics arrange window.
Cyclop has a way of doing it that takes like, five seconds.

Thanks for the reply.
Try using a pitch shifter with small values (nothing too crazy) to get that type of wobbling effect that you hear around 1.30 or 1.31 in the example you posted.
 
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