How do I know what pad is right for my mix?

Discussion in 'Production' started by P255, Apr 19, 2011.

  1. P255

    P255 Member

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    This problem constantly comes up while producing. The more I actually listen to the pads in some bigger producers, I notice that it compliments the track nearly perfectly, I want those dynamics in my stuff, I'm just not sure what to listen for; Ambiance over added rhythm? Or vice versa? Short Synth/Long Synth, etc.
     
  2. tv_g

    tv_g Active Member

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    i eq my pads to compliment the drums. if the drums are a bit dull, push the pads to fill in that deficiency and gut the high-mids, or if the drums are clean sounding, push the pads down into low-mids, etc. stereo width plays a role as well.
    for example i designed a well overly boomy pad so the best drum choice is something with light snares and clean hats. the sub is going to have to be quite low, practically a sine wave to stay out of the path of the kicks which will still need to fit under the pad keeping all things clean sounding.
     
  3. StrifeII

    StrifeII Member

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    Pads are always a "filler" for me. I'll add one to back up the chord progression and add more melodic elements, and it'll only stay there if the track really needs it. Listen to what your mix needs without a pad, and then use it to add that element in - they're generally extremely versatile because they're so rich...

    Try sidechaining too, it'll keep your main elements at the forefront of your track.
     
  4. boobjunkie

    boobjunkie Active Member

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    i like to sample my atmospheres from elsewhere, preferably one that is quite long (30 seconds or so), chop out a small section of it, loop it and cross fade so it sounds smooth, eq, sidechain etc. then you can chop other parts of the atmosphere, hi pass, tape delay, sidechain etc and layer them systematically through the track (mostly in the intro and breakdown) so your atmospheres evolve and stay fresh. it's easiest if you can find a nice long one to start with with different elements cos they'll all compliment each other pretty well, saves you trying to mash a load of separate bits together or synthesize new lines to fit with what you've got.

    film soundtracks/soundscapes are great for this