how do i find out where my drums peak so I can compress them properly??

Discussion in 'Production' started by law_88, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. law_88

    law_88 Member

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    Right, I think I'm beginning to understand this compression thing, I know that the threshhold needs to be set below where the drums peak, and the closer to the peak the more pumping they will be. But how do I go about finding where my drums peak?? I'm using reason 4 by the way
     
  2. Phat_Sam

    Phat_Sam Well-Known Member

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    Check through the mixer. For instance, if you're using Redrum for your drums, solo the Redrum in the main mixer and solo the snare drum(or whatever drum you're trying to compress) and read the mixer. The peak is wherever the dB reader hits.
     
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  3. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    It's really the other way around. When the treshold goes under the peak the compressor starts working. When you start going under the peak more, the pumping will be heard more. So in effect, the further away from the peak level (below it) you are, the more compression you get. Be careful not to overdo it however, and you will be tempted to do so. It may sound really PHAAAATT YEAH at first but keep in mind that it also eats away the impact of the drums, cutting off the snappiness. Remember to listen to the result in the context, withc bass and all.
     
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  4. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    As far as finding the threshhold, I'm not sure in your specific case, but most compressors will have a gain reduction meter somewhere. If you can see this meter lighting up (or down depending which way you look at it, usually looks like a level meter upside down) then the signal is being compressed.
    So you can slowly lower your threshhold and watch the meter to see when you're starting to compress. If the meter is showing just a few notches then you're compressing lightly, if more then more.

    This is a ridiculously simplistic answer, but it may give you a starting point.

    Big topic, best to find something to read up on.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2010
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  5. law_88

    law_88 Member

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    cheers for all the help guys i really appreciate it, i guess its just a matter or repeated trial and error till i get it sussed, it is startin to make more and more sense each time tho which is good. on such a hype with the production thing lately, i'll wake up then spend the whole day practically glued to the computer haha, uni works sufferering in direct accordance tho :eek:!