How Commercial & Underground D&B Can Work Together

Vydx

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#1

craft

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#2
Hadn't seen that before - really interesting, thanks.

Watching that and the other videos I find it amazing how many layers of management / a&r / PR there are in 'the scene' esp at the $$$ end. It's come a long way from the diy days.
 

OneSeventy

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The bit about their impressions of gateway tunes/artists was quite interesting. They all used Sigma as an example but for me, I think Sigma is too far gone. It's too accessible. People who are into that stuff aren't gonna go "I want more of that fast beat with the bass", they're more likely to want more of "that dance music with the girl singing over the top" which they can get on the radio.

It's not the same as Pendulum (which was a gateway for many) because Pendulum's sound wasn't aimed at being commercial, it was still obscure enough that people had to search to find anything similar.
 

Vydx

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I didn't see your initial comments Dagz, but judging from your and JMZ's replies I'm actually glad they were removed (thanks JMZ). I think this thread has some legit potential for honest discussion so I hope we can at least get some pages of that before eventually resorting to our usual banterisms.

Hadn't seen that before - really interesting, thanks.

Watching that and the other videos I find it amazing how many layers of management / a&r / PR there are in 'the scene' esp at the $$$ end. It's come a long way from the diy days.
What other videos? Yeah, I read a piece on the manager of Exit Records, briefly explaining the sort of work that goes into formulating a release, and this is an independent label we're talking about.
http://organicbeats.co.uk/features/interview/william-courtice-runnin-tings

I found it interesting that El Hornet said it was the major label that offered them the most freedom in making their music, whereas the indie dnb labels were more restrictive (needs to be DJ friendly), but I figure Pendulum were trying to get out of the DJ thing anyway, so the same thing wouldn't have been said by a dnb chart topper that still very much wants their music to be played by DJs in the clubs.

As for DIY - the interesting thing about the current climate is, as dBridge mentioned using the Grime people as an example, it has empowered the artist and weakened the labels, self-releasing on bandcamp with pretty remarkable results in terms of sales and popularity.

The bit about their impressions of gateway tunes/artists was quite interesting. They all used Sigma as an example but for me, I think Sigma is too far gone. It's too accessible. People who are into that stuff aren't gonna go "I want more of that fast beat with the bass", they're more likely to want more of "that dance music with the girl singing over the top" which they can get on the radio.

It's not the same as Pendulum (which was a gateway for many) because Pendulum's sound wasn't aimed at being commercial, it was still obscure enough that people had to search to find anything similar.
Agreed, Sigma + Take That thing is more disconnected from dnb than, say, Pendulum, and you have old farts say how far removed Pendulum's sound is from dnb (not complaining), iterating the trickle down effect, but I could be biased because I discovered dnb in part due to Pendulum myself. Just my own perspective.
 

bugo

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#8
Lol @ pendulums sound being removed from dnb.. for a couple of years there they were constantly surprising people with their releases from tonight remix to slam it's all dnb. love the pendulum haters they're usually closet homos
 

Floating Hunter

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#12
Aha such a depth of personalities in drum and bass. Why are people afraid to speak their minds (aimed at dbridge really) ? Think that El Hornet bredda came across the most sure of himself. Didnt really learn too much, kind of obvious chat
 

OneSeventy

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#13
Yeah I constantly felt like dBridge was holding back, sitting there being judgmental in his head but not entirely speaking his mind.

What I found a bit annoying was that neurofunk was the example of underground dnb, where I would have said the more minimal sounds (like dBridge/Exit) are the least accessible/most underground forms of the genre. For me, neurofunk is the dnb most people I know think is dnb. Just like everyone thought dubstep was Skrillex.

I found it interesting that El Hornet said it was the major label that offered them the most freedom in making their music, whereas the indie dnb labels were more restrictive (needs to be DJ friendly), but I figure Pendulum were trying to get out of the DJ thing anyway, so the same thing wouldn't have been said by a dnb chart topper that still very much wants their music to be played by DJs in the clubs.
I was waiting for dBridge to pipe up while they were talking about the major labels giving the most freedom. Thought he would at least try and argue that there are labels like Exit that aim not to restrict the artist.
 

OneSeventy

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#16
Was wondering if the foot shake was a nervous twitch. My brother just went through some anxiety attacks and his feet were going nuts too.
 

craft

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#17
What other videos? Yeah, I read a piece on the manager of Exit Records, briefly explaining the sort of work that goes into formulating a release, and this is an independent label we're talking about.
http://organicbeats.co.uk/features/interview/william-courtice-runnin-tings

I found it interesting that El Hornet said it was the major label that offered them the most freedom in making their music, whereas the indie dnb labels were more restrictive (needs to be DJ friendly), but I figure Pendulum were trying to get out of the DJ thing anyway, so the same thing wouldn't have been said by a dnb chart topper that still very much wants their music to be played by DJs in the clubs.

As for DIY - the interesting thing about the current climate is, as dBridge mentioned using the Grime people as an example, it has empowered the artist and weakened the labels, self-releasing on bandcamp with pretty remarkable results in terms of sales and popularity
There are other vids on that channel from the same event.

Regarding elhornet - Dnb labels release lots of really adventurous stuff but there aren't any that want to sign evermore bombastic neuro breakbeat year after year. Pendulum needed a major label.
 

encounter

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#18
How useless is Marky in this talk, can't answer a single question, has no opinion, probably doesn't want to say anything at all? Absolutely weird.
Funny when El Hornet mentioned that they wanted to explore new music, while their last single's (crush, witchcraft, watercolours) just sounded like the 100th new version of Slam/Blood Sugar just a tad cheesier? But all in all the only person with some decent answers really.
 

jmzmaloney

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#19
People forgot dBridge has just partly signed to Ram? Be a difficult line to walk without sounding like a hypocrite
 
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unitedmindz

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#20
How useless is Marky in this talk, can't answer a single question, has no opinion, probably doesn't want to say anything at all? Absolutely weird.
Funny when El Hornet mentioned that they wanted to explore new music, while their last single's (crush, witchcraft, watercolours) just sounded like the 100th new version of Slam/Blood Sugar just a tad cheesier? But all in all the only person with some decent answers really.
Totally agree, Marky looks like a fish out of water. Possibly the language barrier but I'd say he just doesn't want to get involved. He gets asked a question and answers something completely different!! Got the feeling DBridge was biting his tongue in parts and not saying what's really on his mind.

Totally get the gateway thing though, I was listening to stuff like Technotronic and the Deep Heat collections which opened the door for me to explore the more underground stuff.
 
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