Help me out with fruity compressor.

Discussion in 'Production' started by prettyherb, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. prettyherb

    prettyherb O I

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    Eepz..

    I've been using the fruity compressor for a long time now, without even knowing what it really does. I mostly use it for my kicks and snares, to get them at the right level.

    But what do these knobs 'Threshold' , 'Ratio', 'Type' 'Attack', and 'Release' really mean or do??

    Any help with this would be wonderful.

    Grtz
     
  2. ShaqR

    ShaqR Member

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  3. Elzerk

    Elzerk 00111100 00110011

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    Yeah, google about compressing.
     
  4. ApeCat

    ApeCat Human Dubplate

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    Treshold is the level at which the compressor kicks in, ratio is how much you compress the sound by once it kicks in, attack is how long it takes for the compressor to kick in and release is for how long the compression lasts once it's kicked in.
     
  5. prettyherb

    prettyherb O I

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    I could do that mate but this is dnbforum, i'd like to hear it from dnbproducers u know :D

    ---------- Post added at 18:50 ---------- Previous post was at 18:47 ----------

    Tnx man. Are there specific levels for dnb? Cause in some tracks it slightly looks like the kick is overcompressed, but it sounds always good though :p
     
  6. Dom!Reavers!

    Dom!Reavers! Member

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    its not about recommended settings ever, just use your ears, but a good way to add punch to drums for example is to use a low ratio (2:1 ish), fast attack and release and adjust threshold to taste, the idea is to get the compressor to kick in just after the transient, in order to make the initial hit sound harder... like i say there aren't any recommended settings just listen to the effect you're having on the sound and decide wether you like it or not, oh and it helps to do these things in the mix rather than having the channel solo'ed.. hope that helps
     
  7. Elzerk

    Elzerk 00111100 00110011

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    There is no specific settings regarding genre. It's all about the sound how much to compress and I tend to compress almost everything at least a bit to match the sound levels. In mastering usually the best way to go is with long attack and decay and small ratios. In modern music it's all about sidechaining, this way you can blend even crazier sounds together that take much spectrum range. Tho the perfect mixdown comes when all components are equalised to fit together, but with sidechaining it becomes a lot easier and dynamic , sidechaining different components of drums and percussions together, the bassdrum to bass, cymbals to snares and so on. I use compressing a lot for oneshots, I layer and synthesise every sound I have in my own library, and compressing is very important gluing the drum hits together, first equalised to fit of course.

    ---------- Post added at 20:17 ---------- Previous post was at 20:15 ----------

    Love it when someone posts just before me and I see it only when the page refreshes :p
     
  8. sam the dnb man

    sam the dnb man Variation

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    If if the signal is 4 dB over the threshold and you have a ratio of 4:1, the resulting signal will be 1 dB over the threshold.
    I use buss compression to gel drum hits together.

    Sometimes I use a medium setting such as 4:1. I use an attack time of about 60ms, this means that it will take 60ms until the compression kicks in, which reduces the volume. I will then use the make up gain to bring the overall level back up to where it was prior to the application of compression.
    This is a good way to add 'snap' to your drum hits. Make sure you have a short release time though as consecutive hits will result in drum hits that sound flat as the compression is still active when the other drum hits are playing.