Help A Noobie Thread

Discussion in 'DJ's, MC's & Turntablism' started by sneezing7, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. sneezing7

    sneezing7 .:wOOp:.

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    HI!

    Ok, so I have been listening to dnb for years, but recently I have developed a taste for learning how to mix.

    So basically I have been told that I should learn beat matching with 2 of the same cd's (yeah CD.. I know its not the prefered choice). After a couple of days or two I have got this sorted.

    Now I am interested in trying to blend on track into the other. But this is where I am stumped. I have tried and tried, but for the life of me cannot get it sounding ok.

    Any suggestions on what I should be practicing?

    Alternatively suggestions on 2 tracks that have the same bpm (+/- 3/4 bpm)?

    Cheers!
     
  2. Dustek

    Dustek Finished the PhD

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    Try some house first to get used to pitch matching the beat (speeds of the beat). House has a regular beat, boom boom boom boom.

    Then move to broken beats and snares and bass drums... gets hard.
     
  3. sneezing7

    sneezing7 .:wOOp:.

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    Cool...will try this out

    Cheers!
     
  4. DTR

    DTR the village idiot

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    Also you could try some of Ram Record's earlier stuff, a lot of that was recorded at the same speed. I'll try to find you some specific examples :)
     
  5. sneezing7

    sneezing7 .:wOOp:.

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    cheers mad dave!!

    Really would appreciate it


    Dustek:

    Been trying the house thing you told me. Ok fair enough, it is helping me get my timing in order, but its just sooooooo boring~~:cool:
     
  6. Dustek

    Dustek Finished the PhD

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    You have to walk before you run. A broken beat is difficult to mix.
     
  7. Dj Warhead

    Dj Warhead melvins.co.uk

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    yeah man get sum hard house tunes mate thats what every1 who i know whos any good learnt on. then just practice beat matching. so much easier than starting with dnb.
     
  8. mesh

    mesh Active Member

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    I learned to mix playing silly jump up from late 90s, and then tried to mix 4/4 and couldn't do it !! Just wanted to throw that in ...

    In essence the art of beat matching is training your brain to recognise two different things, one thru each ear. The trick is figuring out whether your incoming track is faster or slower than the one playing, so practising with tunes at the same speed wont really help you here. \
    Once you have trained your ears to hear one thing from the monitor, and one thing thru the phones, and figure out whether phones are faster or slower, a lot of the hard work is done

    So ... using two same-speed tunes is mainly a good technique for practising your drops, and at what point to start the mix. Its good for getting used to handling records, but you cant learn to beat match this way.

    The most important and best fun thing about learning is doing tiw with mates around, so you can laugh at each other and also have fun and advice.


    :word:
     
  9. sneezing7

    sneezing7 .:wOOp:.

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    Their some good points mesh...

    I hear what your saying about training your brain to recognise 2 different things. Admittedly after a week of seriously playing around, I think my brain is now starting to get the concept. I also think that tapping your foot / finger to the current track helps with matching the incoming track (not sure if this is a good or bad habit).

    I could be wrong in syaing this, but it seems as if the learning curve is real steep in the begining, but once you get a few basic concepts down, then the rest should be simple?

    Anyhow, thanks for your help guys, and keep the advice coming through!!
     
  10. sneezing7

    sneezing7 .:wOOp:.

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    Actually, thinking about it further:

    I think the reason I am not enjoying learning how to mix via house music is simply becuase I have no interest in this music.

    As mentioned earlier I do understand the concept that house is easy(ier) to learn on, but it kind of sucks the fun out of it, and makes it a chore.

    Oh well.....like Dustek said, I need to learn how to walk before I can run.
     
  11. mesh

    mesh Active Member

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    Thats broadly correct, it doesnt get simple tho, cos you will keep feeling the need to improve. Thats the fever.:hype: Once you have beatmatching you can learn EQs, crossfader technique etc ... all in good time mate.

    And this is one occasion I don't agree with Dustek , at least buy some simple 140bpm breakbeat mate, its a piece of piss to mix.
    The main reason dnb is harder to beatmatch is because the margin of time over error is greater, ie. a house tune pitched at +6 when its meant to be at +5.5 wanders a lot less in the space of 10 seconds than a dnb tune pitched at +6 when it should be at +5.5
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2006
  12. Dj Warhead

    Dj Warhead melvins.co.uk

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    you defo need to be feeling what ur mixin mate. i learned the basics mixin hard house but it wasn't untill dnb that i felt i was gettin anywhere with music you love the flow just seems to come natrally over time
     
  13. sneezing7

    sneezing7 .:wOOp:.

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    Thats exactly it... at the moment it feels mechanical, becuase I got no love for it.

    I like to think that I have a wide taste of music, but 3 things I cannot get into are house, trance, & opera. Unfortunately the music that disagress with me like Lebanese food, is now an essential part in order for me to learn matching & mixing

    Mesh:

    I might give some breakbeat a go. Again, if you got any suggestions (tracks / producers) let me know!
     
  14. Dustek

    Dustek Finished the PhD

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    If you're mixing with cds and really want to go with dnb at first... try High Contrast, Ez Rollers and Aphrodite, most of their stuff on the same albums has the same tempo (or more or less the same).
     
  15. Critical

    Critical Member

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    defo, your tapping your foot to the rythym thats playing out, while listening to the rythym of the track you want to mix in.

    match your brain to your body and bobs your uncle :)


    have fun
     
  16. Indi

    Indi Tha Original ThreadKilla!

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    Just buy some dnb and mix it. I don't buy this pratising on hard house nonsense, if you don't like the music you're playing, you're never gonna learn to mix it well. Just jump in there head first and learn to swim. Its in this time that you produce moments of accidental genius (every DJ will know what I'm on about, those really good mixes that come from nowhere when you are first learning to mix), these will encourage you to play for longer and try to look for more moments of genius. When you start to be able to predict these moments from the tunes you select, you can improve your technical skills.
    Believe, if you don't develop a hunger for it, it will become stale and you will go nowhere. And you can't develop a hunger by playing music you don't want to play IMO.
     
  17. DTR

    DTR the village idiot

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    Sorry I been a bit slack

    I went through some of my Ram collection...
    Beastman / Electro Melody / Orient Express / Equinox / The Alias / Hush Hush / Mind Killer / Fly Away

    are all pretty much the same BPM. I'll post more if you want, but that should be enough to get you started

    :)
     
  18. Dj Warhead

    Dj Warhead melvins.co.uk

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    sorry mate i disagree with this. when learning how to mix you want it to be as straight forward as possible whereas dnb is not that straight forward. i have no real love for hard house music but the reason that i keep promoting it is because it is straight forward. you can use 16 beats in hard house (rather than 64 in dnb) and it still sounds good. when trying to learn mixin dnb you tend to pick up some very bad habits.
    learning to mix is a hard slow process which takes time and comitment.

    1. this may sound obvious but just practise beat matching and training your ears to listen to tunes at once.

    2. once you've mastered the beat matching. you should be starting to learn the concept of the music (where it drops, breaksdown etc...). this is the key to every mix where and when to drop tunes (sorry about being patronising but i am trying to explain this on a level which can be understood by any entry level dj). you will begin to realise that almost every style of dance music is made up of 64 beats. the idea being that the tune you are mixing in will drop at the end of the other tunes 64 beats. therefore the beats are in sync. (this is not an easy thing to explain but you will work it out with practise)

    3. EQs the levels of the bass, mid and treble. learing to use these correctly will help you're mix to be a lot smoother and easier on the ears. tip - never practise with the EQs on full this will only make it harder when mixin out where the EQs are only set at half way or just over - also it just sounds distorted and crap.
    it is debatable how to use the EQs correctly - obviously bringing up the levels of the tune that is comming in and turning down the tune that is going out. i pretty much keep the bass of the tune i am bringing right down untill i am quite a way into the mix. i will have the mid quite high throughout. the treble is the last thing i will turn up this will make the tune too overpowering for the last one and at the end of the next 64 beats i will drop the tune(unless i am attempting a double drop - this is for another day) and if all steps are followed correctly you should have just pulled of a very good mix.

    this is how i believe is the easiest way of learning to mix by doing it in stages. after this you will be looking to pull off more advanced techniques and developing you're own style of mixin.

    end of essay:spliff:
     
  19. sneezing7

    sneezing7 .:wOOp:.

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    Maybe you could paraphrase/rephrase this?


    The biggest problem I got is that I am in a country where dnb is not "popular", so I am unable to see how a pro does the job. A few mates who are into Trance and shit habve given me pointers, but either I am a natural or mixing trance is a piece of piss. As far as visual training goes, the vids on ROTV have been quite useful, and give me a good idea where a track drops in, and what goes on with the levels, etc....

    But, going back to the trance thing...the music does not seem to be "complicated" like dnb. What I find strange is that I can beat match trance no problems, but as soon as I try my hand at dnb i lose the plot. Does this sound right, or am I just mental?

    Thanks for all the advise so far people, and sorry for sounding like a complete noob - but we all got to start somewhere!
     
  20. Indi

    Indi Tha Original ThreadKilla!

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    @Warhead: While I agree with your principles for mixing 4 beat music like house, I still stick by my opinion.
    The thing that makes dnb stand out from most other dance music in a DJ sense, is that the ways you can mix it is pretty versatile. House, Trance, etc are really structured, so all it takes is a bit of counting and you're set. For the actually learning of beatmatching, it is pretty sensible to start off on house, but there's so much more to DJing than mere beatmatching.
    My intentions were not to harshly criticise your opinions, but I used to work for a DJ workshop youth scheme and saw a lot of noobs learning on house and trance, and then when they crossed over to dnb their mixing was very rigid and robot-like. You could tell the difference between the kids who learnt on house first, and the kids who stuck with dnb from the get-go.
    Hence my reasons for sticking to learning straight away on dnb.(y)