Help a beginner out.

Discussion in 'Production' started by MSUK, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. MSUK

    MSUK New Member

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    Hey guys, I'm new here.
    Now, I apologize in advance if this is the wrong forum to ask this. I've been doing alot of googling today and I stumbled across this site and thought that it might be a good idea to request some help/advice here, seeming to first impression, that most of you guys specialize in this genre.
    One more thing, I apologize if I sound like a complete noob when I post this. I've only just started to bring myself in the DnB music production hobby, and theres a lot I still don't know.

    Anywho. A few months ago, I invested in FL Studio 8. It's the first professional DAW that I've owned(prior to that I used the ejay programs...Horrible things.), and I know the basics, enough to the point that I can develop tracks.
    The problem? I jumped straight into trying to develop DnB. I find the genre hard to master, and that my drum sounds usually pack less of a punch than desired, along with the rest of the elements on the track. I can develop very simple tracks(In my opinion, they're simple) which contain sub-bass, bass drumbeats, pads, and the like.(I also like to slice the amen break into different patterns). I feel that I'm underachieving though, and that theres alot I need to know to progress further. I've found it immensely hard to finish a track, after I've started it, and the ending result is something incomplete, empty, and extremely simple.

    Before I drag on, I want to get straight to the point. I have been searching for a very long time for FL Studio tutorials which relate to drum n bass, or which specialize in the genre itself, and sometimes, just FL Studio tutorials in general. So guys, would you by any chance be able to give advice on developing DnB in FL studio, or by linking me up to some tutorials that may help me along the way. I would also really appreciate it if I was able to gain insight on the structure and melodical feel of a typical drum n bass track, particuarly intelligent/ambient drum n bass.

    I also have an extreme interest in ragga jungle/old-skool jungle(Tracks like The Burial-Leviticus are very inspirational) so if somebody could also give me insight on that also, it would be so appreciated.

    I'm sorry if I'm asking alot, and if I seem impatient, but I would really like to progress and gain experience in music production. It's been one of my interests since I was young.

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2009
  2. SoS_Productions

    SoS_Productions New Member

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    Alright bro, let's get you started.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tc803Fyo5XQ

    This is a very basic way of creating DNB.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOiexfpZrWI

    Here is another way of doing it.

    In FL studio, if you want to create DNB, meet the Fruity Slicer. This is your new best friend. Learn the ins and outs of the Fruity Slicer, as this will be where you will be chopping all of your breaks.

    If you want, I will post you a sample DNB track that I did in FL Studio in .FLP format, with drums, synths, and a decent Reese bass. Sometimes the best way to learn is by seeing it first hand.

    Finally, the reason you aren't getting a good sound from your drums is because you aren't layering. Some "pro" producers will have anywhere from 5-10 kick and snare layers (This isn't always the case though, as a few solid layers can do the job). Basically, layer your drums with different sets of drums. Make sure your drums are mono, and DRY. It will take you awhile to get it down, but don't give up, and the most important thing is to continue to learn more everyday.

    Listen to the track "Combination Styles" by Break on youtube. Very basic track, something anyone can do, but the secret is, he's got great samples.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2009
  3. SoS_Productions

    SoS_Productions New Member

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    I don't think I've stressed enough how much time and effort this really takes. You have to realize that you won't be creating tracks overnight. Never be satisfied with what you have.

    Check out http://drumnbass.be This is a very good site, and where I learned to produce DNB from a user named Battledrone. He's been doing this for year's, and he is always willing to help. The production forum on that site will get you very far. Also, download breaks, and drums on that site, they have a lot of good quality stuff, that will help you get that punch in your drums.

    Don't get overwhelmed bro, this is a process, but nothing feels better than completing your first real DNB tune. Drum n Bass is a form of art, so be creative.
     
  4. sotalex

    sotalex man your battlestations

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    welcome to the forum mate,

    good the have some fresh blood up in here. Well it's difficult to answer to all of your questions atm. anyway, you've been making dnb now for a few months, but it is really hard to make a classic in a few seconds. Even the best on this forum work very very hard to make their tunes sound nice. Rome wasn't build in one day you know.
    Just search the production forum on here to search for tips and you tube tutorials. The one from chase and status really helped me out.

    Don't worry about the mastering part tho', that will become very clear after a while. Just focus on your main breaks, basses, melodies and fx's. You can make a good track without mastering. Just keep making tunes an ideas and practise, search for tutorials etc...
    Try to post up your tunes and breaks, whatever you have on this forum, as everybody on here would happily give you some feedback and tips.
    Don't know what else to say tho', if there is anything else you're bothered with, just ask...

    hope this was a usefull reply

    Sotalex
     
  5. sotalex

    sotalex man your battlestations

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    nice feedback you did with the fl tutorials but I do not quiet agree with you on this statement, because a lot of kicks would take away a lot of space in your mix.
    Everybody has their techniques tho', and I really respect that. I do respect yours 2 but my opinion is that Maximum 2 kicks can give you a nice, cleanily and punchy kick. I don't know if a lot of producers use a lot of kicks in their songs, but they didn't in the tutorials I saw.

    You could disagree with my opinion tho', not eveybody works with the same ideas.
     
  6. SoS_Productions

    SoS_Productions New Member

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    No prob, I respect that. Basically, everyone has a different a way of doing it, so you just have to find what works for you. Personally, I use about 4-5 layers of kicks and 2 layers of snares. I compress them all a little differently to get that punchy sound, and EQ them seperately.
     
  7. MSUK

    MSUK New Member

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    Thanks alot guys. I already learned quite a bit by watching the youtube tutorial that was posted.
    Yeah, I use the fruity slicer quite alot, but usually for the rearranging of typical jungle breaks/loops, such as amen and funky drummer. I've never really used it for anything else, so I'll try that out.

    Damn. Please do. That give me a great amount of help, seeing it actually done in FL itself.
     
  8. SoS_Productions

    SoS_Productions New Member

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    Alright, here you go. What you have is 3 different basic drum patterns, a shitty synth, a pretty good reese, and a decent low bass. I put it all in pattern format so you can see what hits where, but you should send it all to piano roll. Have fun!
     

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    Last edited: Jan 19, 2009
  9. MuttleyDubs

    MuttleyDubs Member

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    Last edited: Jan 19, 2009
  10. SoS_Productions

    SoS_Productions New Member

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    Also, I didn't add any breaks, but you can basically put any break over that beat and it will work. And you're right, use the Slicer only for the chopping of your breaks. The only other use I have for it is chopping vocals and effects.
     
  11. DJ Wizz

    DJ Wizz Bless, Union, Force FM

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    meh i dnt like fruity
     
  12. MuttleyDubs

    MuttleyDubs Member

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    i dont like it, i love it i do
     
  13. perspective

    perspective Sex Drugs & Sausage Rolls

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    :word:

    better than a clip round the ear.

    solatex & Muttley are right, its not really how much you layer stuff up but more what you layer that matters.

    Post some stuff in the New Talent section (inside the Production forum) - it would help to hear what kind of sound you are getting - you aren't going to get any kind of negative feedback but you will get more great advice like the posts above :)
     
  14. MSUK

    MSUK New Member

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    I do have one that I uploaded onto youtube, which was an attempt at an intelligent/ambient jungle track. But in all honesty it was just me messing about with the amen break. Plus it was extremely simple.
    I mean I could post a link to it, but it depends if it'll help.
     
  15. Dustek

    Dustek Finished the PhD

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    If you like old skool ragga jungle, I seriously suggest you don't bother with learning modern dnb technique UNTIL you know you've made a couple of tunes you're happy with and want to progress. Modern dnb is fucking difficult to produce - requires tons of engineering and production knowledge. Old ragga jungle was made on stunningly simple equipment and has very simple structure and engineering (relatively).

    Try and slap some Amens together with some samples. If you're trying for TC production levels you're going to be get very frustrated soon - and there is no reason for you to bother doing so.
     
  16. SoS_Productions

    SoS_Productions New Member

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    Post whatever you got, I want to get a feel of your style. When you mean ambient DNB, I'm thinking early Doc Scott or LTJ Bukem, and messing with the amen break can achieve this.
     
  17. MSUK

    MSUK New Member

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    Hm. Alright then.
    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=0kMt3fI16bI
    This was the 'attempt' I was talking about, which was made in November. It was my first tries at jungle, so I apologize if it's repetitive.
    Adding to that, compression is most likely off(I'm not really very knowledgeable about mixing and mastering)
     
  18. Ketz

    Ketz Thinkin outside the box..

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    totally agree :D www.drumnbass.be good site i would recomend it too
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2009
  19. Phyella

    Phyella Chef 'n' Bass

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    I second (third?) that :)
     
  20. MuttleyDubs

    MuttleyDubs Member

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