Bass Guiding low frequencies

Elzerk

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#1
Hello,

I'm currently suffering from a problem with low frequencies. I can't hear some of the freq's around 50hz with my studio monitors, while you go up from there it starts to flatten and every other freq's are as flat as I can make them. This spot where I sit in relation to speakers, is there any way to guide these low frequencies to my ears or help make them more audible? There is no big problem since I can just change to my headphones and check the sub, usually I listen with headphones anyway before locking down any mastering setup. When I rise from my chair and and go back about half an meter I can start hearing these sub frequencies, I was thinking maybe sitting further away or placing monitors farther away but in my case it's very tricky since I don't have a lot of room.


I'm gonna add couple of pics just for shits and maybe they give a bit vision what I'm talking about.





 

Elzerk

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#3
Manufacturer claims it to be from 35 Hz to 20 kHz. 8" woofer. I think it's all about the acoustics since the frequencies are very much audible when walking around the room, wonder if it's even possible to guide them to the "sweet spot".
 

Mr Fletch

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#4
Every room is different, but a good starting point is to face the short wall and start by sitting 38% of the room length. apparently.......
 

Mr Fletch

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#7
I 1st read it on the gearslutz forum. And after searching around a bit, I've found it referenced on several other music "sweet spot" articles. It's not fool proof, as every room is different, and obviously, any alcoves etc will effect resonance differently. But as a rule, it's a good starting point.
 

SafeandSound

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#9
A common problem.

The real solution is to bass trap your rooms corners first, then floor to wall then ceiling to wall.
Immediate action to take :

Try temporarily bunging any ports in your loudspeakers for the perspective of a sealed enclosure speaker. Reflex designs can produce inaccurate and over blown notes around the port resonant frequency. Also they can produce a "one note bass" effect where bass notes around the tuning frequency have a similar and difficult to distinguish tone. (basically inaccuracy) Bunging the port with a thick sock for a short period will give a new perspective.

Move around a little and get another perspective and try to balance out the issue. i.e. if the note is weak at your monitoring position and very strong 2-3 feet away then you know a happy medium will be the goal.

cheers

SafeandSound Mastering
online mastering studio
 
Last edited:

miszt

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#10
A simple solution, but quite effective: Very gently place one finger on the rim of your bass driver, you can feel the sub movement that way, dont press on the speaker at all, just touch it as lightly as you can, obviously there is no substitute for a decent sub bass monitoring setup, but in the mean time your finger can be a very useful tool
 

miszt

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#11
bare in mind that moving your speakers around may be deceptive, you may change the positition of any standing waves in your studio which makes the sub more obvious, but tht doesnt mean you are getting a good idea of whats going on; bass traps are a good solution, although for very low sub freqs they can be difficult to implement
 
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