Going over the Top in 2014

Discussion in 'Waffle' started by IV4, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. IV4

    IV4 Currently a newt.

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    The Lord Kitchener Poster ^^^^
    So this year marks the beginning of the 100 year anniversary of the Great War. Being a proper history nerd I thought I would make a tread about the topic for others to share information. Seeing how most of you are from the U.K. or at least Europe I hope this might be of interest to many of you. Europe as a whole payed a terrible price for the war. One-hundred years later I wonder why so many needed to die, and what did the legacy of their deaths mean to modern civilization. Profound poetry was written, incredible artwork made, and the predecessor to the U.N. was formed. Today most of Europe is at peace and works with each other splendidly. Is this because of lesson from the the two great wars, or despite it.
    Let us begin.

    This is my favorite documentary. It is free to watch on you tube. WWI in Colour. I think it is interesting that Americans spell color different than the rest of the English speaking war.


    I plan on watching this one soon.


    Here is some Propaganda pics.
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    It is propaganda like the works above that convinced many men from all nations to join the Military. In a book I have called Discovering the Western Past: A look at Evidence page 330, a list of countries and statistics are given. The satistics are in the thousands so you need to add three zeros to any number. For example total killed in Britain Ireland is 723,000 not 723. The countries listed are:

    Country Total Killed or Died Total Mobilized Prewar Male Population
    Britain, Ireland 723 6,147 11,540
    Canada 61 621 2,320
    Australia 60 413 2,320
    New Zealand 16 129 320
    South Africa 7 136 1,700
    India 54 953 82,600
    France 1,327 7,891 9,981
    French Colonies 71 449 13,200
    Belgium 38 365 1,924
    Italy 578 5,615 7,767
    Portugal 7 100 1,315
    Greece 26 353 1,235
    Serbia 278 750 1,225
    Rumania 250 1,000 1,900
    Russia 1,811 15,798 40,080
    United States 114 4,273 25,541
    Allied Total 5,421 45,001 204,018

    Germany 2,037 13,200 16,316
    Austria-Hungry 1,100 9,000 12,176
    Turkey 804 2,998 5,425
    Bulgaria 88 400 1,100
    Central Powers Total 4,029 25,598 35,017

    Total Overall 9,450 25,598 239,035

    Out of all the participating countries listed above roughly 40% of the total pre-war male population died in the war. To find any percentage of death simply divid the death toll number by a population number or mobilized number.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2015
  2. Catsel

    Catsel Well-Known Dismember

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    am american?

    tlakin bout ww1?

    u fo reel?

    fool
     
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  3. IV4

    IV4 Currently a newt.

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    I am not one for poetry. For the most part, it annoys me how petty and whiney people can be. I believe it to mostly be cleverly worded expressions on boring or over stated topics. However, this war in particular has produced some of the greatest and profound poetry that I believe mankind has ever written. Here are some examples of great poetry and not so great poetry from WWI.

    Siegfried Sassoon,
    The General, 1917
    ‘Good-morning; good-morning!’ the General said
    When we met him last week on our way to the line.
    Now the soldiers he smiled at are most of ’em dead,
    And we’re cursing his staff for incompetent swine.
    ‘He’s a cheery old card,’ grunted Harry to Jack
    As they slogged up to Arras with rifle and pack.
    * * *
    But he did for them both by his plan of attack.


    Charles Peguy
    Blessed Are 1914
    Blessed are those who died for carnal earth.
    Provided it was in a just war.
    Blessed are those who died for a plot of ground.
    Blessed are those who died a solemn death.

    Blessed are those who died in great battles.
    Stretched out on the ground in the face of God.
    Blessed are those who died on a final high place,
    Amid all the pomp of grandiose funerals.

    Blessed are those who died for their carnal cities.
    For they are the body of the City of God.
    Blessed are those who died for their hearth and their fire,
    And the lowly honors of their father’s house.

    For such is the image and such the beginning
    The body and the shadow of the house of God.
    Blessed are those who died in that embrace,
    In honor’s clasp and earth’s avowal.

    For honor’s clasp is the beginning
    And the first draught of eternal avowal.
    Blessed are those who died in this crushing down,
    In the accomplishment of this earthly vow.

    For earth’s vow is the beginning
    And the first draught of faithfulness.
    Blessed are those who died in that coronation
    In that obedience and that humility.

    Blessed are those who died, for they have returned
    Into primeval clay and primeval earth.
    Blessed are those who died in a just war.
    Blessed is the wheat that is ripe and the wheat that is gathered in sheaves.

    Ernest Lissauer
    Hymn of Hate 1914
    French and Russian they matter not,
    A blow for a blow and a shot for a shot;
    We love them not, we hate them not,
    We hold the Weichsel and Vosges-gate,
    We have but one and only hate,
    We love as one, we hate as one,
    We have one foe and one alone.
    He is known to you all, he is known to you all,
    He crouches behind the dark grey flood,
    Full of envy, of rage, of craft, of gall,
    Cut off by waves that are thicker than blood,
    Come, let us stand at the Judgment place,
    An oath to swear to, face to face,
    An oath of bronze no wind can shake,
    An oath for our sons and their sons to take.
    Come, hear the word, repeat the word,
    Throughout the Fatherland make it heard.
    We will never forego our hate,
    We have but one single hate,
    We love as one, we hate as one,
    We have one foe, and one alone --
    ENGLAND!

    Take you the folk of the Earth in pay,
    With bars of gold your ramparts lay,
    Bedeck the ocean with bow on bow,
    Ye reckon well, but not well enough now.
    French and Russian, they matter not,
    A blow for a blow, a shot for a shot,
    We fight the battle with bronze and steel,
    And the time that is coming Peace will seal.
    You we will hate with a lasting hate,
    We will never forego our hate,
    Hate by water and hate by land,
    Hate of the head and hate of the hand,
    Hate of the hammer and hate of the crown,
    Hate of seventy millions choking down.
    We love as one, we hate as one,
    We have one foe and one alone--
    ENGLAND!


    Wilfred Owen
    Dulce et Decorum Est 1917 (It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country.)
    Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
    Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
    Till on the haunting flares(2) we turned our backs
    And towards our distant rest(3) began to trudge.
    Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
    But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
    Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots(4)
    Of tired, outstripped(5) Five-Nines(6) that dropped behind.
    Gas!(7) Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
    Fitting the clumsy helmets(8) just in time;
    But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
    And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime(9) . . .
    Dim, through the misty panes(10) and thick green light,
    As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
    In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
    He plunges at me, guttering,(11) choking, drowning.
    If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
    Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
    And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
    His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
    If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
    Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
    Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud(12)
    Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest(13)
    To children ardent(14) for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
    Pro patria mori.(15)

    Sorry about the numbers I am copying and pasting.


    John McCrae
    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.

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    We participated too, although we were not as consequential as we like to think we were as far as combat goes. In a war of attrition we provided the allies one thing the Germans did not have, reinforcements. A quote from a Erich Maria, "All Quiet on the Western Front" "For every one hungry, wretched German soldier come five of the enemy, fresh and fit. for every one hungry German army loaf there are fifty tins of canned beef over there. We are not beaten, for as soldiers we are better and more experienced: we are simply crushed and driven back by overwhelming superior forces."
     
  4. tewky1

    tewky1 Well-Known Member

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    Gavrilo Princip and the events that unfolded by sheer chance, pure luck in the streets of Belgrade, leading to the death of Franz Ferdinand, what a fascinating story, that shaped the world as we know it now.

    Dan Carlins Hardcore History - Episode 50 Blueprint for Armageddon, tells the story from the assasination in Belgrade to how the political landscape was looking following, and how the war unfolded. If you have 3 hours to spare, is a most interesting and engaging listen.
     
  5. Jwood27

    Jwood27 VICTIM

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    Holmes new book about the run up to WW1 is interesting as well apparently, next on my list to read.

    lots of stats there, always interesting stuff though.

    poetry wise i'd have to say anthemn for doomed youth is probably one of the better ones imo.

    "What passing-bells2 for these who die as cattle?
    Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
    Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle
    Can patter out3 their hasty orisons.4
    No mockeries5 now for them; no prayers nor bells;
    Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, –
    The shrill, demented6 choirs of wailing shells;
    And bugles7 calling for them from sad shires.8
    What candles9 may be held to speed them all?
    Not in the hands of boys but in their eyes
    Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
    The pallor10 of girls' brows shall be their pall;
    Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
    And each slow dusk11 a drawing-down of blinds.12"
     
  6. Catsel

    Catsel Well-Known Dismember

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    so much txt to read... .

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2015
  7. RUSSLA

    RUSSLA DNBF Monarch

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    Not having a dig (there's no pun there) but how does the thread title have any relevence to what you posted?
     
  8. rysk

    rysk Part-time waster

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  9. RUSSLA

    RUSSLA DNBF Monarch

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  10. $marty

    $marty Dexcell Staff Member

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  11. Kenneth4Eva

    Kenneth4Eva Let's Breed

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    the commanding officers during WW1 for fucking idiots.

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    The Crucified Soldier refers to the widespread story of an Allied soldier serving in the Canadian Corps who may have been crucified with bayonets on a barn door or a tree, while fighting on the Western Front during World War I. Three witnesses said they saw an unidentified crucified Canadian soldier near the battlefield of Ypres, Belgium on or around 24 April 1915, but there was no conclusive proof such a crucifixion actually occurred. The eyewitness accounts were somewhat contradictory, no crucified body was found, and no knowledge was uncovered at the time about the identity of the supposedly crucified soldier. During World War II the story was used by the Nazis as an example of British propaganda.

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  12. IV4

    IV4 Currently a newt.

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    This is a German artist named Otto Dix. His paintings are weird and amazing. If you care to, check this guy out. He is really interesting.
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  13. Catsel

    Catsel Well-Known Dismember

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  14. logikz

    logikz I Am Not The King Staff Member

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    world war thread? i was in all the big ones 4 5 and 6 mostly, annnnnnd noooo wait... mmmmmmyep those are my fave star wars movies. whats this thread again, ww2? i dont get it, wheres sweden on the list?