Gain + Master Issue

Discussion in 'DJ's, MC's & Turntablism' started by DEF:STAR, Aug 23, 2014.

  1. DEF:STAR

    DEF:STAR Member

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    N00b here and I have an easy question for you guys as I am not sure if I am doing this right.

    When I'm mixing two tracks I typically do the following: 1) set the incoming track gain so that it's in the top of the green level, maybe slightly in the orange. 2) beatmatch everything and then I typically will drop the bass completely on the incoming track and turn down the highs to maybe 9-11 o clock (usually don't touch mids) 3) using the channel fader I bring the track up (I don't use the cross fader) but here where the problem is. With the incoming tracks bass cut and highs lowered, once I bring my channel fader up maybe half way my master starts to jump into the high yellows.

    My question: Is that bad? I don't play out yet but I've read about places where they don't want you going that high on the master and I can understand that. Is there a better way to do this? How is it possible to have two tracks playing , both faders all the way up, without the master peaking? Or even with double drops...wouldn't that automatically clip the master? Or should I never have both channel faders at max level. I'm using a Pioneer DJM 700 also, if that helps.

    Any help is appreciated!
     
  2. ConEP

    ConEP Member

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    Decent mixers tend to have tons of headroom up to 20db, even if you are way into the red it wont be clipping the signal, a djm 700 has 19db headroom, i would set gains for each channel so it peaks into the first red on a pioneer and your golden

    Hope this helps
     
  3. Teddy

    Teddy 60% Staff Member

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    You can sort of control the mid with the channel fader. From what your doing it sounds like you have a decent grasp of the concept. Think of the mid EQ as the volume control.

    A good way to look at your master volume and eq's is... track A is full volume,,, if your adding something in, u need to take something out... Example, if your going to mix in some mid range from track B, you might need to make some room for it by taking away some mid from track A. Less is more.

    This is just theory tho.. general rule - if it sounds good, your doing it right.

    Play around and record your mixes.
    Start with recording just track A. Get it to sit nicely in the wave window like this. http://cdn.portableapps.com/AudacityPortable.png

    then mix something into it and try to maintain the same(ish) level of volume.
    if it clips like this
    http://i.imgur.com/EjiwO.png
    its gonna sound bad on playback.

    Play around, practice and perfect. If you want to record one mix to get some thoughts on how it sounds, feel free to post audio in here. I'm not claiming to be an expert or anything but I'll certainly give you my opinion.
     
  4. DEF:STAR

    DEF:STAR Member

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    Thanks for the advice! I finally figured out how to record so I'm going to try to get some mixes out!