frequency problem

Discussion in 'Production' started by Cat Gas, Oct 1, 2010.

  1. Cat Gas

    Cat Gas Aka Basis

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    I have a piano sample which I really want to stand out on the drop, however, its hitting in the same frequency as alot of the other elements. (particularly the bass, as it's quite a low piano.) How can I make it stand out, apart from obvious sidechaining?
     
  2. msmith222

    msmith222 redbeard

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    possibly a subtractive eq on the piano pulled way down with a very narrow Q, then sweep across the low end until it sounds better?
     
  3. Neomind

    Neomind Too many skulls!">:O

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    here are some tips:
    -you can get the bass (and other elements) be played more mono and the piano be wider in the stereo spectrum.
    -you can get rid of any elements clashing with the piano (might not be what you want, but this can be a catalyst to new and fresh ideas)
    -get the piano to play other notes or viceversa (get the bass and other elements to play other notes).
    -pan one element left and other right.
    -bring up the fundamentals of the scale of what the piano is playing, or get the freq where these fundamentals are and bring down the other elements in that range.

    there are too many other things to do but I think that with these you can go along ;)
     
  4. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    Timing is key too. Make some gaps in the bassline and stick your piano hits in there.

    Bass is a rhythmic instrument after all.