Filter Sweeps?

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#1
Can someone please explain this process to me.

I assumed filter sweeping just meant modulating the cutoff on a filter so that it creates a sweeping sound, but on closer googling inspection, white noise seems to be at the heart of it...

Oh, and while I'm here, can someone please explain to me the function of the Wavetable Position knob on Massive's osscilators... I've been really getting my head round Massive, and I've had this function explained to me a couple of times, but I still don't really get it...
 

logikz

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#2
you can filtersweep white noise or you can use white noise as an LFO operator but other than that i do not see what white noise has to do with it
 
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#3
Hmmm, weird, the first couple of search results when I googled 'filter sweep' came up with filter sweeping related to using white noise, but I think that's just coincidence... So is filter sweeping just a filter gradually opening up the longer the note's played? And how do you use white noise as an LFO operator?
 

logikz

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#4
yup, any filter you do some gradual change over time is a sweep far as i know. some samplers have white noise on their routing, specifically emu samplers.
 

richie_stix

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#5
Hmmm, weird, the first couple of search results when I googled 'filter sweep' came up with filter sweeping related to using white noise, but I think that's just coincidence... So is filter sweeping just a filter gradually opening up the longer the note's played? And how do you use white noise as an LFO operator?
could be making riser effects using a filter sweep and white noise as the source you are refering to finding?

also, a sweep could be a band/high/low pass opening/closing over time (y)
 

Phat_Sam

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#6
the wave table positioning on massive is a knob that controls the oscillator waveform. eg. SAW - SQU 1 (or whatever the first one is) basically means that if you turn the knob fully to the right then it will be a pure square wave. turn it fully to the left and it will be purely a saw wave. have it in the middle and it will be a combo of both.

try itout and see what i mean. thats the basic principle anyway. it gets more complex when u start using waves like the multiplex or the growl wave but its the same principle.
 
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#7
Well obviously you need to put something through the filter as you're sweeping the cutoff... filters don't make any noise by themselves unless they self oscillate, but that's a whole other effect. Noise + filter sweep = instant whooosh. Try different types of filters, as well as reverb, delay and other FX for varied sounds :]
 
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#8
the wave table positioning on massive is a knob that controls the oscillator waveform. eg. SAW - SQU 1 (or whatever the first one is) basically means that if you turn the knob fully to the right then it will be a pure square wave. turn it fully to the left and it will be purely a saw wave. have it in the middle and it will be a combo of both.

try itout and see what i mean. thats the basic principle anyway. it gets more complex when u start using waves like the multiplex or the growl wave but its the same principle.
Nice one - That makes sense, quite simple really! :)
 
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#10
filter sweeps, are litlerly sweeping the cut off of a filter. you can use it on white noise, drums, basses... well anything you like! and about the wavetable postion... ive never used massive, but assuming its a wavetable synth, otherwise i dont see why it would have this knob, changes the position in the wavetable, giving you a different waveform. i.e a wavetable is made up of (right me if im wrong) 32, 64, or 128 single cycle waves. usualy each wave differs slightly, rahter than lots. generaly it will be the original wave an it will add harmonics as you move the knob up, but it could be anything from a sine wave and the next postion could be a sawtooth, the opposite of each other! if thats not how massive's wavetables work, its the basic principal of wavetable synthesis! hope it helps ib
 
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