Extraction of a sound clip from movie/tv show

Krispy

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#1
If I wanted to take a sample of a quote of someone saying something out of a movie or tv show for incorporation into a song how would I go about doing that?

I suppose I would have to have the particular episode or show on my computer but then what program would I use to extract a specific part out?

Any ideeeeeeeeeeas?
 

moriaty

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#2
theres loads of programs for that job, and it all depends on the format you have.
do a search for it on google , for example "avi to wav" or "avi audio extractor".
alternatively, you could just play the video, and record its output on Audacity or similar wave editor.
 

Oxidyze

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#3
As stated before, many programs will do this job. Sound Forge, Cool Edit, Waves Labs, Audacity, Ex. I've used all of these programs before, and all I had to do is play any audio off of my computer, and record it directly into the wave editor.

All of the programs listed have the ability to record any audio that your computer plays (movies, your sequancer, you tube, internet flash videos, MP3's playing off your PC, anything!)

The main thing that determins weather or not it works correctly is how your soundcard is hooked up. I've known people that have used the programs listed above and they were not able to record any audio there computer plays... If it dosn't work, it's not the program, it's the way your soundcard is set up. Every soundcard and on-board soundcard has diffrent ways of being set up.

Hope this helps
 

fisher

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#6
i just use a headphone to headphone cable, plugged from the headphone socket to the mic socket, so what ever you play you can record. just record the rough bit around the sample (as you wont be able to hear it with the cable plugged in) then just edit it down after
 

moriaty

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#7
i just use a headphone to headphone cable, plugged from the headphone socket to the mic socket, so what ever you play you can record. just record the rough bit around the sample (as you wont be able to hear it with the cable plugged in) then just edit it down after
no, thats completely wrong. here's the proper way of ripping movie samples:
make a big cone out of thick cardboard, and place it inside the cup of your headphones. now connect the mini jack to the mic socket, and play the sample you want from the speakers. point your megaphone headphone towards the centre of the room and press record.
that way you'll catch all the reverberation of the room, along with the magnetic field thats created by the friction of the sound waves on the cardboard cone. Thats the only certain way to know that your movie samples have the edge and polished highs that will make your tunes to stand out.
its almost guaranteed that you'll be signed on a 3 year contract with a major label once you start using this method.
good luck.
:rinsed:
 
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