EQing tips

dafo93

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#1
Hey all, I've been trying to figure ot EQing recently, but haven't had much success lol. Can anybody give me a guide as to which sector and frequencies the following sit in frequency range:

Kick Drum
Snare
Crash
Hats
Pad
Sub bass
Wobble bass
Lead synth
vocals

Cheers in advance, as this will help a lot :not_worth:alchy:
 

kama

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#4
When EQ'ing drums, try to find 1 resonant frequency in each element by sweeping a steep slope through the spectrum and listening when it sounds good/harsh and boost/cut accordingly.

Harmonics are important as well. If your kick sweet spot is for example 90Hz, pay attention to 180Hz, 360Hz, 720Hz, 1440Hz and so on. These are it's harmonics and boosting those areas with a steep Q will make it slice through the mix.

Let's say you got a kick with +2dB@90Hz and it sounds really really sweet with +3dB@360Hz. Then you move on to the snare, it's ok but the main peak is @350Hz and sounds too similiar to the kick harmonic. You tune the snare until it hits 250Hz (Between the kick harmonics at 180Hz and 360Hz, right?), but the hihat has a good ring at 500Hz which would be the 1st harmonic of the snare, so you cut the snare -1.5dB@500Hz and compensate with the ring of the hihat +2dB@520Hz, then find a good harmonic for the high end of the hi-hat etc...

The harmonics are more relevant to tonal instruments and recording but at least I've gotten nice results to have that own slot for each drum or element in the mix. This way when no 2 sounds fight too much for the same frequency space, you can push the track a little louder before peaking to red. This also makes buss compression a lot easier when no sound will drown another one out.
 

dafo93

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#6
lmao i think some reading up is in order before I understand some of that...I understand some of it but not all of it :) Cheers anyway I'm sure it'll help me later on ;)
 

*State

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#10
lost me at sweeping a steep slope? I just grabbed my broom and looked out the window for a hill.
P;ease explain mr kama
Hhhhhmmm how can i explain this...... You tighten the band by making it really narrow to sweep for wanted/unwanted frequencies. I'll see if i can find a video that explaines it better than i can.:)
 

kama

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#11
You're not far off with the hill analogy.

In most parametric (=adjustable) EQ plugins there are 3 options per band (=1 single frequency booster or cutter). The first and most obvious would be the frequency in which it works. The second would be the level, or how much it boosts or cuts, measured in decibels. The third is bandwith (sometimes referred to as Q), which means the width of the area that the boost/cut affects. If it's a small area, the bandwith is steep.

So if you narrow the Q (or bandwith), it affects a really small area in the spectrum. This is how you get precision to the adjustment, surgical style. Then when you add a good large boost to that narrow area, you'll hear exactly what is going on in that area. Then when you start adjusting the area it effects, you're effectively sweeping the spectrum with a steep slope band. If you can see the EQ in a graphical fashion, it really looks like a strange kind of mountain or a hill.

Now when sweeping, keep in mind the instrument you're listening to (like the kick in my first post) and try to find the real sweet spot it has. A good training method is to grab hold of the frequency parameter with your mouse while the track is playing, close your eyes and start sweeping until you find a good frequency. This way the graphical side of things wont come in the way.
 
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#16
Hey all, I've been trying to figure ot EQing recently....
There are no golden rules for eq-ing
it’s a dynamic process and is going
be entirely dependent on what’s in
the sound you are working on and what
you want to get out of it....
ultimately you want to start with the
best samples you can.. the less work
engineering the more time spent on
actually writing the tune...

use your ears and trust them if you
are using decent monitors in a decent
room... in the end its all about how it
sounds... so use your ears to tell you
what sounds good and what doesn’t...

don’t process a sound for the sake of
it... have an idea of what your trying
to achieve before you begin processing
a sound... why are you pulling out the
EQ...? what’s the sound lacking... maybe
it doesn’t need to be eq-ed maybe there
is something else in the way... sound is
to dry... stereo spread is to wide... etc..

if necessary reference with another tune...
how does my snare compare to Noisias....?
or how does my sub bass stack up against
sub focus...?? reference with tunes you
know... listen and compare...

all that in mind a few things to remember...
dance music is all about weight... the
majority of your tracks energy should sit
below 250 Hz... this is where the weight
comes from... Subs should sit around 50hz
with kicks coming an 8/ve above this
at around 100hz... Hi and low passing subs
is a good idea as it saves head room and
stops the subs clashing with the kicks...
an 8/ve above the kick should come the body
of the snare... your bass should sit around
100 - 250hz...

these are the main elements of the tune...
and the need to have real presence in the
low freqs...
 

motion audio

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#17
There are no golden rules for eq-ing
it’s a dynamic process and is going
be entirely dependent on what’s in
the sound you are working on and what
you want to get out of it....
ultimately you want to start with the
best samples you can
.. the less work
engineering the more time spent on
actually writing the tune...
This, getting the source sound right is the most important, eq in most cases should be there to bring out part of a sound not to shape it.
 

subprime

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#18
Some good stuff here. I've been on this forum for a few months now, and have learned so much from or through it. Some of the little nuggets of gold are buried in the old threads.
I know there is a production links sticky, but that's mainly links to samples and loops.
I reckon there should be a sticky where the really good posts about mixing and eq-ing and mastering can be moved to.
It is the production section after all and it's all pretty necessary information.
Big up the dnbforum crew for helping all the newbies like myself.
 
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#20
I reckon there should be a sticky where the really good posts about mixing and eq-ing and mastering can be moved to.
ive noticed dubstep forum
have a "production bible" sticky...

seems like a terrific idea...

their scope is quite comprhensive
to... they cover a lot of ground...

no reason it couldnt be done...

could be a big help to a lot of
producers and save people asking the
same questions over and over...
 
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