EQ'ing Drums

Discussion in 'Production' started by jack2290, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. jack2290

    jack2290 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    Bristol
    Major novice question here , but i was wandering do you guys change/alter the eq on your kick drum once more elements like the bassline are introduced?

    If i have my kick drum sounding quite prominent and punchy, once the bassline comes in the levels start clipping. Whereas if i EQ them so it fits well with the bass, the drums on the intro sound weak and flat.
     
  2. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    1,397
    Likes Received:
    189
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Good question.

    You'll definitely want to EQ your kick within the context of the whole mix, bass included. If you find that no matter what process(e)s you throw at the kick (EQ, sidechain compression, etc.) it's still not sitting properly with the bass, you may need to either try tuning the kick (toss it in a sampler and audition using different keys) or simply finding a new kick to use.

    I know it may not be the answer you wanted, but I assure you it will save you many wasted hours trying to EQ the hell out of a kick that may just not "fit" in the mix due to its timbre.

    Cheers.
     
  3. tv_g

    tv_g Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    LA
    Notch out the bass with eq where the fundamental of the kick is hitting. Or as lostnthesound mentioned, if the fundamental of kick is close to the sub's, you might need a different kick or eq the kick rather severely to have a different dominant frequency.
    That said I have had patterns where the bassline hits at the same time as the kick, so I eq just those kicks (since they hit at the same time it is still a punchy downbeat) but maybe only done this twice and it is a bit of a pain to set up and keep track of.
     
  4. spyre

    spyre sample all the things

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2010
    Messages:
    788
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    NZ
    Most of the time you'll want to eq the sub out of your kick. The snare is important too, cut out everything below the 'punch' point, probably a good idea to put a final highpass eq on your drums bus also.
     
  5. Prideinyouride

    Prideinyouride Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Messages:
    340
    Likes Received:
    15
    You could also automate the kicks LP cut off so let's say during the intro it's cut off is low, or even off completely, sounding big and heavy. Then when the sub hits set the LP filter to pass at say 80hz.

    I know this isn't the answer your after but a handy tip to give the impression your kick is HUGE as once other elements hit your ear "should" be distracted to them and not so much the weight of your kick.
     
  6. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    1,397
    Likes Received:
    189
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Great tip!
     
  7. mykono5

    mykono5 Aru R.

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Indonesia
    I usually sidechain the bassline with the EQed kick drum to avoid clipping. It sounds a bit of wobbly though... but well that's how I do it to avoid clipping... :)
     
  8. D-Jhepz

    D-Jhepz ◕‿◕

    Joined:
    May 16, 2012
    Messages:
    2,196
    Likes Received:
    253
    Location:
    ╭∩╮(︶︿︶)
    maybe increase the attack on the compressor?
     
  9. RUSSLA

    RUSSLA DNBF Monarch

    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Messages:
    6,259
    Likes Received:
    885
    Location:
    BH1
    A simple enveloper on the kick attack can make it cut thru aswell. Also learn about perceived loudness of kicks, it doesnt have to be subby to be heard.
     
  10. radicallight

    radicallight New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    You can split your basslines into sub and low-mid/mid frequencies. Filter out around 100hz and let the Kick come through. Side chaining can do it also, but can sound a bit "pumpy".
    Eq or filter your kick, roll off the sub a bit and check for errant high frequencies. Ditto with your snare, but highlight around 200hz to let it snap.
    It's just a case of letting each element have it's own frequency space.