Ear Fatigue Recovery

Discussion in 'Production' started by Menosance, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. Menosance

    Menosance aka OSOI

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    Hi guys,

    Currently I am working on my music and at the same studying for my A levels which will take place next week. Now I am trying to maximize my time as much as possible for both of these priorities and my question is this: What is the fastest way to recover for ear fatigue?? I use headphones to produce so they get quite tired after 2 hours hearing the same stuff and it is slowing me down a bit.

    Any recommendations how to solve this efficiently?

    Thanks,
    Menosance :)
     
  2. fractal

    fractal Well-Known Member

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    low volume levels? not sure what you want to hear to be honest...eat well, live a healthy lifestyle?

    do some producing...do some work...repeat?

    dont use headphones all the time?
     
  3. miszt

    miszt BASSFACE Royale

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    dont use headphones, bad for your ears, unless they are well enough designed for you to keep the volume down, even so the pressure waves are far higher than from speakers at a reasonable volume, and as fractal says, low volumes as much as possible (will do wonders for your mixdowns aswell)

    Regular breaks are important aswell, you'll have to figure out what is good for you - bearing in mind it takes 20-30 minutes for your ears to 'relax'

    - - - Updated - - -

    more appropriatly sized signiture images helps to :p
     
  4. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    Both of the above posts have much wisdom.


    I'd add that if you've gone too far and now HAVE ear fatigue and want to speed your recovery I'd recommend two things:

    1. turn off your monitors and slowly become aware of all the sounds naturally going on around you. Start with the quietest thing you can find and focus on listening to just that, once you've relaxed into it add the next quiet sound you hear and focus on the first sound plus that sound; repeat until you can hear everything in the room. For me it'll take about 10 minutes to get into everything (assuming I'm in a quiet studio setting w/ at least basic acoustic treatment

    2. put on some low level pink noise and space out for a lil.



    But as the above posts have suggested the best defense is total prevention.
     
  5. Menosance

    Menosance aka OSOI

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    Thanks guys for the help. Life is really busy at the moment. :)
     
  6. wilf

    wilf Fliwo

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    Yeah from my experience there's no quick fix. Which is why it's important to make sure you give it at least a day before listening to a tune you've just made again. The number of times I think I've made an absolute belter and I listen the next day and it turns out to be a pile of shit...
     
  7. Menosance

    Menosance aka OSOI

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    That is pretty much why I'm asking this. Well I figured out that at least spending around 3 hours doing mundane tasks can help.
     
  8. Raptor's Den

    Raptor's Den Member

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    Yeah, exactly what Miszt said, he pulled that straght off my tongue, or mind, or whatever that analogy is haha... yeah the pressure mang, is really immense directly into your ears on all levels, not only bass, but mids, and highs, those highs and everything basically is, within a pressurized chamber of sorts, is being pushed into your ears... so speakers are my best recommendation, get a wider sound output so its not pretty much just pumping into your ears... yeah at shows music is loud but its significantly wayyyy less fatiguing then headphones, still can though depending on the sound system lmao
     
  9. SafeandSound

    SafeandSound Mastering Engineer

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    If you only have headphones reduced listening volume. Getting outdoors in fresh air is always good.
    If you mean fatigue as in loss of objectivity finishing a mix in the morning as opposed to late at night is best.

    Cheers

    SafeandSound Mastering