Drum Processing question

Discussion in 'Production' started by RATCUB, Aug 7, 2013.

  1. RATCUB

    RATCUB Member

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    Whenever I get a eat going that I really like, a big thing that throws me off is how flat and soft it tends to sound. I was listening to skream the other night and noticed in his song "Top Gear" the drums had so much depth, and it almost sounded stereo, like they were all around me. How might accomplish this? Also, how can I give my beat more depth?

    Here's the beat Im struggling with making more dynamic.
     
  2. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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    Try adding some really subtle reverb to your drum bus, with a short decay time, and a small dry/wet ratio. Also, parallel compression will do wonders for achieving that bigger sound you're after
     
  3. Dark Lizardro

    Dark Lizardro The Lizard that has a hammer Staff Member

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    If I'm not mistaken, on the other thread where there's this link of a Noisia "tutorial", the guy responsible for the drums uses the stereo imaging section of Ozone on the drums, to make them wider. Am I correct? Would this work?
     
  4. miszt

    miszt BASSFACE Royale

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    before you use stereo imagers, work on your panning, seperate hits arond the stereo field, while the kick and snare are down the middle, will give a big sound, stereo imaging can make things unpredictible, something to learn and play with, but panning is more useful at this point

    balancing all your percussion is important to, and layering up diffrent drum kits, and then compression to glue it all together (keep it gentle and attack long enough to let the kick really punch thru the mix)

    as Fletch suggested, parallel compression is great to - I'd recomend getting used to inline compression first, then play around with parallel once you've got that figured out, parallel limiting is also a great tool, but I still recomend standard inline compression to be learnt first
     
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  5. IV4

    IV4 Currently a newt.

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    Volume can play a big picture in my opinion with drums too. When songs are originally mixed at lower volumes the drum's punch shines through without hitting the red line.
     
  6. miszt

    miszt BASSFACE Royale

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    yes absolutely, mixdown at low volume, this is one of the best tips for mixdowns, it will work wonders for the balance of your tracks (reason being that your brain compresses loud music, making it very difficult to judge the balance of a track)
     
  7. padders

    padders Member

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    Also check out Icicles production video, he does lots of panning of his drums and uses short delays to achieve this. I thing I do is have the main snare central but have a maybe a rimshot or tamb layered. What I will then do is make two copies of the hit, pan one to the left one to the right. IF its a simple two bar loop I might have it left on the first, right on the second left on the third and then a variation on the fourth.
     
  8. johneysvk

    johneysvk tnuc

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    got a link to that skream tune?
     
  9. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    I may be mistaken, but I think what he did was apply the Ozone stereo spreader to his bus containing his overheads, which is a pretty solid idea.
     
  10. graffitizax

    graffitizax Hauntr

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    try sidechaining your kick and snare with your breaks and the other elements in the drums so that they kinda rush in and out, it sounds awesome
     
  11. Dark Lizardro

    Dark Lizardro The Lizard that has a hammer Staff Member

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    To be completely honest, I didn't watch the whole video, plus I had my newborn baby was crying every 5 minutes, so I may have not noticed it :/
     
  12. Kopacetic

    Kopacetic Member

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    Play around with the velocity of your hats, breaks, and percussions for each note. And real life, a drummer won't constantly hit a hi-hat at the same exact velocity level.
    Add a tad a reeverb to the snare, but not so much.
    Consider looking up Parallel Compression (or NY Compression). This compression technique will make your drums sound more full and less flat.