Dnb Production Software

Sneaky G

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#1
Getting annoyed at all the crap software for writing music.

I really want to express the dnb that i've got in my head!

Anyone got a recommendation of the ideal software for writing drum and bass?

I know there are a few links given but they aren't actually that helpful. Anyone know what the actual producers use, i mean the up and coming, not people like Andy C who can afford to spend money on amazing software, that is if they don't get it for free. :jerkit:

But people like us!

Intermediate software that is user friendly and affordable and is actually known for being used as a drum and bass production program.

Sort me out someone please
 

sdm

This is Dog Fort
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#3
Beginners generally use Reason or FL Studio (Fruityloops)

Professionals generally use Cubase or Logic

That said, you can use any you're comfortable with. Big names use all of the above, there is no correct or best answer to your question.

Get a demo before you buy.
 

Serum

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#5
If you want to use hardware then you're best with logic on mac or cubase on pc but for just pc based music fruityloops is great and easy to use on its own. Reason is only really any good with rewire so you're using cubase or logic as well.
 

zoob

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#6
Reason is a great start package, it allows the budding new producer to get a feel for all aspects of studio production within on package. You can learn the art of synth creation, what A/S/D/R means and doe's. Sampling. And numerous effects functions.

What i find with reason is that in comparasion with a decent sequencer i.e cubase, the reproduction of the sounds is weak and empty.

We are running cubase nowdays and i think its great, its fairly straight forward, and links nicely with reason if you want it to.....

For now, if you basically haven't a fucking clue what you've doing, get reason, and start from that, master it. When i mean master it, i mean you need to spend probably a year, becoming a god on it. By that, a track can be produced inside a day. To as good a standard as Reason can generally produce ( Fresh - Temple of Doom - entirely reason 2. That is impressive).

Then when you are ready, move on to a sequencer/software combination. All the Native Instruments synths are Grade A, its a regular choice of Pendulum, and Shy Fx sold all his hardware to convert to them, financially its a massive saving.

When you know theres a synth out there that you really want ( i had to get my Virus C), then get it, otherwise you can operate on a minimal budget, other than a high powered MAC/PC, ( i suggest MAC) and try to make it music specific rather than your general machine as well. ESPECIALLY if its a PC, as they are geigh as fuck and like to die.

Hope it helps (y)
 

Dustek

Finished the PhD
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#7
Sneaky G said:
Getting annoyed at all the crap software for writing music.

I really want to express the dnb that i've got in my head!

Anyone got a recommendation of the ideal software for writing drum and bass?

I know there are a few links given but they aren't actually that helpful. Anyone know what the actual producers use, i mean the up and coming, not people like Andy C who can afford to spend money on amazing software, that is if they don't get it for free. :jerkit:

But people like us!

Intermediate software that is user friendly and affordable and is actually known for being used as a drum and bass production program.

Sort me out someone please
I think you've got the wrong attitude. Absolutely amazing dnb came about 10 years ago. Geezers were producing tracks on equipment with less potential and capabilities than your current cell phone phone.

Software nowadays is insanely easy to use. You can crank out a tune in a couple of hours - might not be good but you'll only have yourself to blame

Andy C, Bad Company, Pendulum, Dillinja, Roni Size, Photek etc. don't make excellent tunes because they have shitloads of expensive equipment and software but because they know what they're doing and have the tunes in their heads. The really expensive equipment they have is just for perfecting the music - you might not hear the difference between their 5000 quid sampler and a software one but they do. Give them an Atari ST and they'll still make music that will have you dancing around your bedroom.

If you can't be bothered to sit down and learn to use Reason or Cubase or Fruity Loops or even Magix Music Maker, then you haven't got the passion to make dnb. There you are - that's a list of software.

If you can't be bothered to learn how to use the software then there is no magic solution to turning you into a great producer.

Same as being a dj - if you're not hearing the music and don't have the skills to play - then spending a shitload of money on a Technics 1210mk5 II and a Pioneer DJ600 will not make you sound any good but Andy C would sound good mixing on a belt-drive.

Its you, not the equipment that counts.
 

Serum

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#8
Dustek said:
I think you've got the wrong attitude. Absolutely amazing dnb came about 10 years ago. Geezers were producing tracks on equipment with less potential and capabilities than your current cell phone phone.

Software nowadays is insanely easy to use. You can crank out a tune in a couple of hours - might not be good but you'll only have yourself to blame

Andy C, Bad Company, Pendulum, Dillinja, Roni Size, Photek etc. don't make excellent tunes because they have shitloads of expensive equipment and software but because they know what they're doing and have the tunes in their heads. The really expensive equipment they have is just for perfecting the music - you might not hear the difference between their 5000 quid sampler and a software one but they do. Give them an Atari ST and they'll still make music that will have you dancing around your bedroom.

If you can't be bothered to sit down and learn to use Reason or Cubase or Fruity Loops or even Magix Music Maker, then you haven't got the passion to make dnb. There you are - that's a list of software.

If you can't be bothered to learn how to use the software then there is no magic solution to turning you into a great producer.

Same as being a dj - if you're not hearing the music and don't have the skills to play - then spending a shitload of money on a Technics 1210mk5 II and a Pioneer DJ600 will not make you sound any good but Andy C would sound good mixing on a belt-drive.

Its you, not the equipment that counts.
Spot on

Wrote my first release on a PC that was a total pile of shite. It is possible you just got to graft a little harder if your equipment is pants
 

zoob

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#9
Dustek said:
I think you've got the wrong attitude. Absolutely amazing dnb came about 10 years ago. Geezers were producing tracks on equipment with less potential and capabilities than your current cell phone phone.

Software nowadays is insanely easy to use. You can crank out a tune in a couple of hours - might not be good but you'll only have yourself to blame

Andy C, Bad Company, Pendulum, Dillinja, Roni Size, Photek etc. don't make excellent tunes because they have shitloads of expensive equipment and software but because they know what they're doing and have the tunes in their heads. The really expensive equipment they have is just for perfecting the music - you might not hear the difference between their 5000 quid sampler and a software one but they do. Give them an Atari ST and they'll still make music that will have you dancing around your bedroom.

If you can't be bothered to sit down and learn to use Reason or Cubase or Fruity Loops or even Magix Music Maker, then you haven't got the passion to make dnb. There you are - that's a list of software.

If you can't be bothered to learn how to use the software then there is no magic solution to turning you into a great producer.

Same as being a dj - if you're not hearing the music and don't have the skills to play - then spending a shitload of money on a Technics 1210mk5 II and a Pioneer DJ600 will not make you sound any good but Andy C would sound good mixing on a belt-drive.

Its you, not the equipment that counts.
Totally, you still should have the basis for decent tracks inside you, whether the equipment you are using gives you the ability to create the 'right' sound is beside the by. You should still be able to get your ideas and emotions down, no matter what you are using.
 

beercandy

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#10
I think you've got the wrong attitude. Software nowadays is insanely easy to use. If you can't be bothered to sit down and learn to use Reason or Cubase or Fruity Loops or even Magix Music Maker, then you haven't got the passion to make dnb. Its you, not the equipment that counts.
Completely aggree. Although we'd all love for a magical shortcut, there is none. What we do have though is insanely competitively priced software and samples that before weren't possible without label support.

That said, you can use any you're comfortable with. Big names use all of the above, there is no correct or best answer to your question.Get a demo before you buy.
Personally I started off with MAGIX which was great for making music, and then moved onto Ableton after I liked playing with a Lite version that came with a USB keyboard. I've heard great things about Reaper too and feel that Reason is a good introduction point for those coming from a more hardware background. At teh end of the day, it is the output, not the tool that matters.
 

Dark Lizardro

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#11
Completely aggree. Although we'd all love for a magical shortcut, there is none. What we do have though is insanely competitively priced software and samples that before weren't possible without label support.



Personally I started off with MAGIX which was great for making music, and then moved onto Ableton after I liked playing with a Lite version that came with a USB keyboard. I've heard great things about Reaper too and feel that Reason is a good introduction point for those coming from a more hardware background. At teh end of the day, it is the output, not the tool that matters.
I'm sorry to inform you, but you basically acted as a necromancer on this post, answering something from 2004.
 

Solace

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#12
Completely aggree. Although we'd all love for a magical shortcut, there is none. What we do have though is insanely competitively priced software and samples that before weren't possible without label support.



Personally I started off with MAGIX which was great for making music, and then moved onto Ableton after I liked playing with a Lite version that came with a USB keyboard. I've heard great things about Reaper too and feel that Reason is a good introduction point for those coming from a more hardware background. At teh end of the day, it is the output, not the tool that matters.
You do realize this thread is from 10 years ago, right?
 

RUSSLA

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#16
[MENTION=98024]beercandy[/MENTION] sort yur life out m9 :p

Necrobumping is so very frowned upon old chap, especially if you're not even asking a question!
 

ARTFX

Artist, sound designer and tutor
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#17
Every DAW is capable of producing good Drum & Bass.

Logic, Reason, FL Studio, Ableton, Bitwig, Pro Tools and Cubase are all great pieces of software that'll do what you need.
 

djdizzy

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#18
Sonic Foundry's Acid Pro is the only DAW capable of producing drum n bass. You'll also need Syntrillium's Cool Edit Pro for effects. This is what Pendulum used and what Netsky still uses.








j/k
 

Optimal Prime

Specialising in the arts and crafts of Drum & Bass
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#19
I think you've got the wrong attitude. Absolutely amazing dnb came about 10 years ago. Geezers were producing tracks on equipment with less potential and capabilities than your current cell phone phone.

Software nowadays is insanely easy to use. You can crank out a tune in a couple of hours - might not be good but you'll only have yourself to blame

Andy C, Bad Company, Pendulum, Dillinja, Roni Size, Photek etc. don't make excellent tunes because they have shitloads of expensive equipment and software but because they know what they're doing and have the tunes in their heads. The really expensive equipment they have is just for perfecting the music - you might not hear the difference between their 5000 quid sampler and a software one but they do. Give them an Atari ST and they'll still make music that will have you dancing around your bedroom.

If you can't be bothered to sit down and learn to use Reason or Cubase or Fruity Loops or even Magix Music Maker, then you haven't got the passion to make dnb. There you are - that's a list of software.

If you can't be bothered to learn how to use the software then there is no magic solution to turning you into a great producer.

Same as being a dj - if you're not hearing the music and don't have the skills to play - then spending a shitload of money on a Technics 1210mk5 II and a Pioneer DJ600 will not make you sound any good but Andy C would sound good mixing on a belt-drive.

Its you, not the equipment that counts.
What this guy said 101%

There is a lot of amazing free software out there as well as far as plugins go. It's just trying to find the best that there is to offer (unless you use Reason). Someone actually posted up a recent thread which I reposted on Twitter over here which covers some of the best free stuff from 2014. Also don't think of software being suited to a specific genre, it can be done in anything. Any process which alters the sound can be useful. The great thing about DnB is that you can utilize almost anything in some way, using the most abstract sounds. I personally use Cubase and pretty much any sequencer can be used as they are all super powerful these days. It was back like 10 years ago that the likes of FL had much bigger limitations. There will always be little things that each DAW do slighty different, but in general, there are barely any limitations aside from your CPU. Just look for that thread on the free plugins as a starter.
 
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