Different volumes in tracks

Discussion in 'DJ's, MC's & Turntablism' started by Rubs90, May 29, 2009.

  1. Rubs90

    Rubs90 KeyControl

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2008
    Messages:
    2,024
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Bristol
    A lot of tracks I own in vinyl have different volumes, and at first I wouldn't care much, but recently I noticed it's starting to affect a bit since double drops don't quite sound the same if one tracks loud as fuck and the other one is cowering in a corner

    What do you DJ's out there normally do to solve this issue? At the moment I just memorize which tracks need a little boost and try to remember that when I'm cuing them, but of course I can't remember all
     
  2. D-Tektiv

    D-Tektiv Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,540
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Brandon, Florida
    I'm a rookie myself at spinnin' vinyl, so can't help ya out there, but I know what ya mean...one track sounded like it was in mono compared to the other...
     
  3. muzzadj

    muzzadj POW!

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Messages:
    9,247
    Likes Received:
    220
    Location:
    Hurstpierpoint- Near Brighton
    check the lights on your mixer i guess.. if its that much louder then it will probs be redlining or alot higher so just turn it down until they are even then perfect it when your in the mix
     
  4. MARKLAR

    MARKLAR International Tracksuit Salesman

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Messages:
    15,034
    Likes Received:
    650
    i tend to just try my best to remember.
    or bring it in a bit before the drop to test the volume.
     
  5. D-Tektiv

    D-Tektiv Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,540
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Brandon, Florida
    Yeah true, i forgot that part already, lol...my friend who's teachin' me was tellin' me to watch those as well..only had a couple of practices, so not all sunk in yet
     
  6. boobjunkie

    boobjunkie Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,099
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    SW LDN
    if you haven't got a mixer with the input lights on it you can just check through your headphones, turn the eqs on the track you're cueing so theyre at the same level as the track playing through the speakers and swap between the two tracks in the headphones, adjusting the trim of the track you're waiting to cue until it's at the same level as the other track
     
  7. Saint

    Saint Buried Audio

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    Messages:
    3,722
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    Leeds
    Or just play both tracks through the headphones and see which is louder..
     
  8. DTR

    DTR the village idiot

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    As others have said, that's what the Gain is for ;)

    Bear in mind the "loudness wars" though. For the last few years dnb producers have been compressing the fuck out of their tunes to get them to sound louder. They're not really louder but to the human ear they sound it. If you played a recent tune alongside something from pre 2001ish then the newer tune would probably sound louder even if they were peaking at the same level.
     
  9. Alexi

    Alexi Drench Audio

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    997
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bristol/Southampton
    I've found this as well, but it's actually helped me as it means I concentrate more on the balance of the mix when bringing the tune in, rather than just whacking the fader up, hoping for the perfect mix.
     
  10. Gloxxy

    Gloxxy I SNORT COAL

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    949
    Location:
    TUT' MINES
    I use my ears. If you A/B the tunes on the right and left deck in your headphones you can usually tell if it needs a boost or not.

    As a rule 33rpm records are quieter than 45rpm. 10" and 7" presses are quieter than 12".