Defining bass lines based on spectrum...

monq

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#1
Hi all,

I was reading some sort of "bass line" definition that defined sub bass like this: "ub-bass occupies the frequency range from 20 - 100 Hz. It is not so much heard, but felt. Sub-bass is responsible for creating a low-end presence that gives a bassline its power."

Now, if I am not mistaken, everything between 60 and 100 is clearly heard?

This guy defined the three types of basses like this:

1) Sub-bass: 20 - 100 Hz
2) Mid-bass: 101-250 Hz
3) Hi-bass: 251 Hz and up

But what I understand by sub-bass is clearly in the 20-50 hz area...

What do you guys think? I am trying to create a good sub-bass from scratch and I want to ensure that I am eqing out the right frequencies!!!

Cheeeeersssss!!! :not_worth
 
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#2
id say thats pretty much it.

23-47 hz is definitely the rumble zone for me though

unless youre using a straight sine wave youre going to have harmonics at 2x that (50-100hz) though which adds to the more audible sorta bass range
 
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Innovine

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#3
id say thats pretty much it.

23-47 hz is definitely the rumble zone for me though

unless youre using a straight sine wave youre going to have harmonics at 2x that (50-100hz) though which adds to the more audible sorta bass range
what sort of speakers have you that can output 23hz?
 

thedjnifty

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#5
There's no point in having any frequencies below about 35 hrtz really, because most speakers simply won't cover it

Plus, if your tune ever get's cut to vinyl anything lower will simply be removed otherwise the needle will just jump right off the vinyl
 

monq

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#6
cheers people, thx for the feedback, I am still confused - i.e. shall I keep < 35 frequencies or chop'em off, but I guess that the best way to proceed is to listen to quite a few samples and analyse them until I find what I am lookin for...

thx!
David
 
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#7
just from some googling
A phono cartridge has no problem reproducing signal well below 20 Hz, and that can be a big problem. Both the playback and recording turntables have some "rumble" (LF noise from the bearing) and LPs also can be warped. Many phono preamps have a deliberate roll off below 20 Hz so as to minimize this signal, which would needlessly use amplifier power and cause woofer cones to "pump" in and out with adverse effect on the higher frequencies. Most rumble is vertical groove modulation, and better rumble filters cut this component of the signal, starting at a higher frequency like 30 Hz,
so yeah keep it above 35 i guess
 

monq

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#8
cheers dequo, now its time to find a good limiter/gater freebie vst to chop my high and <35 hz frequencies, and I am in! :D
 

T Leaf

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#9
id say thats pretty much it.

23-47 hz is definitely the rumble zone for me though

unless youre using a straight sine wave youre going to have harmonics at 2x that (50-100hz) though which adds to the more audible sorta bass range
its generally a bad idea to have anything below 35hz in a 'clean' production.

-35Hz will muddy up the track. taking out 0 - 35Hz relieves the track of DC offset and improves overall headroom. all my tracks have a blocker at 30hz minimum :)

my tip of the day

:slick:
 
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