Creaking bass

JimpaDirt

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#1
I've been trying to make a bassline with a kind of a creaky sound, similar to spor's sound.

Like in this track: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7f-Cu1kawo the bassline hits round' .50

I tried with some low saws and phased them and gave it a minor delay. It's quite close but not as close as I wanna be so.. any clues? :D
 
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Mr Fletch

aka KRONIX
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#2
A reece bass made of 3 saw waves, one detuned up, one detuned down, one left as is. Bitcrushed, distortion and some minor reverb (maybe) then put a notch filter on it and automate it to open and close randomnly!

Thats my guess anyway!
 

subprime

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#3
The pitch bend and filter movement will play a big part in the sound, also frequency splitting, clean sub, scooped out mids and a ton of distortion on the higher freqs.
I mean, I'd only be trial and error man, but that's what I'd be trying next.
 
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#5
Yeah, I was gonna say resample, THEN the pitch bends so that you're "bending the FX curves" as well. That said I've never gotten close but am fairly close to giving up - after 5 years.

Taking a nice high HPF or BPF sample of some narlyness at an 88.2KHz rate and then putting it down an octave has given me some nasty results - maybe too nasty but it's worth a shot.

One trap that I get into is relying on one patch for all reese sounds - Spor, Noisia, et al don't treat them so much as instruments, but as samples - so, that really nice sound here in the loop is made by a very different process than that nice sound there, or the one over here, or that one that just came in once, or that great one in the fill - sounds time consuming, don't it?
 

Mr Fletch

aka KRONIX
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#6
Better resample if you want good movement..
I completely disagree with this comment.

You have so much more control over automations and movement if you keep it in the synth. Once it's bounced, all the original movement will be there, but you wont be able to change it at all. So it will be a continuous loop of the same thing. Alternatively, you can add FX onto the bounced sample after exporting it then do the automations, but you will be relying heavily on Fx after your original sound. In my eyes you can get so much more movement inside the synth you use to create the initial sound.

As far as resampling goes, it a great way to save CPU space and has other benefits too, but I prefer to create all my automations within my synth's
 

Attire

Last Winter
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#7
I completely disagree with this comment.

You have so much more control over automations and movement if you keep it in the synth. Once it's bounced, all the original movement will be there, but you wont be able to change it at all. So it will be a continuous loop of the same thing. Alternatively, you can add FX onto the bounced sample after exporting it then do the automations, but you will be relying heavily on Fx after your original sound. In my eyes you can get so much more movement inside the synth you use to create the initial sound.

As far as resampling goes, it a great way to save CPU space and has other benefits too, but I prefer to create all my automations within my synth's
Very true, and worthwhile baring in mind.

Also, exporting 2/3 versions of the audio would give you different examples of the random movements within the sound from the FX you use.
Layering these could give interesting results :D
 

JimpaDirt

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#9
Yea, so I tried out to add some bitcrush and detune to my previous sound and the outcome was rather close to be honest. Could use some more bend, I will look closer into that! :) I'm closer than ever this time, great help guys! :D
 

subprime

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#11
One trap that I get into is relying on one patch for all reese sounds - Spor, Noisia, et al don't treat them so much as instruments, but as samples - so, that really nice sound here in the loop is made by a very different process than that nice sound there, or the one over here, or that one that just came in once, or that great one in the fill - sounds time consuming, don't it?
I agree, it's a little idea that can open up big doors.

as for the time consuming bit, yes and no. Just export every cool sound that you come up with into your own bass sample pack, if you're in the zone keep tweaking the synth and making variations, even if you're not going to use them straight away.
 

JimpaDirt

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#12
Just try loads of different things but I'd recommend you stop trying to emulate other artists and just try making something new.
I sure do try to create my own sound, I don't intend to use this in any sort of copycat way I just really dig that sound and wanted to know how to create it! It's all about expanding your pallet that you paint your tracks with right? :)
 
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