Cracks and making Remixes

Discussion in 'Production' started by DigitalDevil, Oct 25, 2011.

  1. DigitalDevil

    DigitalDevil New Member

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    Hi

    First of all: I don't have any cracks, but I've some questions concerning the law and ethics . I'm pretty sure that many producers were using cracks when they began with DnB/Dubstep, because there are so many usefull tools which can be used and it's just to much for a beginner to afford everything, because as beginner you don't even know, if you will like to produce music and if you have talent and a full software equipment would cost something like 4'000 $. What do you think about this that? Is it okay to begin with cracks and to buy everything, when you're sure about it? And what would be the outcome from a legal view, if you would become popular and make money.
    I know some producer who are still using cracks, even though they're popular (but they don't make money yet AFAIK).

    And about mixing some tunes: Is is legal and okay to remix tunes? AFAIK you must have the permission of the artist to use it and if you want one you have to pay money even if you don't want to sell the remix.
    Do I have to take a look on something, if I want to make tunes which I would offer for free?

    For your information: I've buyed FL Studio and NI Massive and I know that you can do pretty much with that, but there are sooooooo many usefull VSTs ...

    If something is ununderstandable I would appreciate it if you would indicate me (even if you only know a better formulation). I'm from Switzerland and not so good in english.

    Many thanks
    Cheers
     
  2. Lucider

    Lucider Member

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    If you use the word "ununderstandable" you're talking like an American, nice work.

    Yeah it's illegal to remix, HOWEVER, in the U.S. the Supreme Court case on this was rather interesting. Bottom line is that hip-hop's use of samples got "grandfathered" in (it would have been lunacy to say that the history of hip-hop was illegal) and that one can use samples from another artist as long as the resulting work of art is unique and original, not simply another version of the song. Again, it's really interesting to hear the Supreme Court discuss "the aura of a work of art."

    In reality bootlegs are great! My girl spins french hard tekno (hardtek, hardfloor, frenchcore, tribe, etc.) and those French labels are ALL ABOUT crazy illegal remixes, no way they got the rights to them (we're talking rolling stones, louis armstrong, system of a down, the list goes on), and they sell them! We buy all vinyl and I think they get away with it cause it's just inside the Teknival culture and the U.S. labels *don't know about it*.

    I'd say remix illegally as much as you want because that's what hip-hop and dnb are all about - don't get caught up in what's legal just make the tune that YOU want to make. Besides, do you think someone on soundcloud is going to recognize that miles davis lick and go "hell yeah, that's tight" then click the "report copyright infringement" button? Nah, they're just grooving.

    Stealing software is bad, everyone does it, support Linux.

    - J.P.

    Blatant sampling, but not "remixing" - as in, no one would say this is a remix of "Big L's Street Struck" or Miles's "Sivad" or "On the corner":


    Sorry this mixdown is lame, it's from like 4 years ago - at least you'll find out how well your speakers can hit an F - anyway, I don't think that my use of samples in this would be a problem...well, the Big L plays long enough that it's most likely in violation, but I think the Miles Davis is fine.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2011
  3. DigitalDevil

    DigitalDevil New Member

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    Hahaha, don't praise me. I'm sorry for my mistake, but I'm happy that I've learned something. :D

    Thank you very much for these informations!!

    Good point.

    Thank you for your opinion. I know that fans wouldn't report an artist, but I'm unsure if a label would initiate legal steps if they would notice it.

    I know that stealing software is bad (I'm software engineer), but the demo versions have way too much restrictions. I don't see even any good points in demo versions. If you want a programm you can download somewhere a crack and most of the users does it. That's reality.
     
  4. groelle

    groelle Well-Known Member

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    wouldnt care too much about any legality issues when first starting out.

    no way im gonna splash out 600+ bucks on something i dont even know if im gonna use it in 2 weeks time.

    and you cant hand back software as you can with literally everything else you buy. so cracked software for learning and getting to know something is absolutely right in my book.

    imo etc pp.
     
  5. horace111

    horace111 My name is Jago (HYQXYZ)

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    Gradually start buying back when you are sure of the software you are using and see it as a tool that you'll keep using for a long time. For example I've tried all known DAW's for windows, cracked. But I stayed with FL studio for a long time , so I bought that.
    Remixing is actually illegal in most countries, but I think that as long as you don't get any profit from them , it doesn't really matter. I've made some , but they are all downloadable for free and I haven't had any problems with them.