Computerized, Distorted vocals?

Discussion in 'Production' started by Nicholas Stigma, May 6, 2012.

  1. Nicholas Stigma

    Nicholas Stigma STEADY ON OL' CHAP

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    It begins on 1:05

    I wonder how do you computerize vocals, can I just simply import a sample, link it to a mixer and then play a bit with the filtering?
    Or you need a vocoder?
     
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  2. spyre

    spyre sample all the things

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    Sounds like a synth to me
     
  3. Skuff

    Skuff Well-Known Member

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    Sounds heavily vocoded to me. (the vocal at 1.26) can't here any vocal at 1.04 on my phone though
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2012
  4. marcelkennard

    marcelkennard Storms comin in Annie

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  5. Attire

    Attire Last Winter

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    I think you can timestretch vocals and achieve some weird effects like this.
     
  6. Ritual

    Ritual Member

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    how about using a Vowel filter. i know the PSP WOW filter has a vowel filter section...
     
  7. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    In music, those vowel sounds are what are referred to as "formants" and essentially are made up of the dominant part of speech–vowel sounds (a,e,i,o,u). These vowel sounds of course directly correlate to musical scales, the most basic of which is Cmaj (C = doh, D = re, E=me,etc.).

    Those "talking" synths you hear via Massive, Predator, etc. are using formants to create the "voice" you hear. Try running your vocal through a vocoder that contains some type of formant filter in the signal path. Or, experiment with the formant and performer within Massive for some interesting results.
     
  8. Salvus

    Salvus Member

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    Lost, you never fail to amaze me with your depth of knowledge! A real production section hero!
    Can't actually listen to the tune at the moment but I guess playing with a vocoder would be a good start. Design your synth sound and then use the vocoder to merge the vocal with it.
    I've got a vocoder in my korg R3 which is pretty cool (not that I've made anything too usefull with it...fun though)

    But tbh, lost said it all...and more! :)
     
  9. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    Thanks for the kind words Salvus, I greatly appreciate it!

    To add a bit more info about the usefulness of formants, it's good practice when trying to achieve the infamous "chopped vocal" effect to pick out the parts of the vocal where the emphasis is placed on the vowels (i.e. formants). You'll achieve the best results when rearranging them to create a rhythmic pattern. Furthermore, you'll get the best results when running formants through a vocoder to emphasize the sound.

    Next time you hear a track with the chopped/stuttering vocal, take note as to what sounds you're hearing...there's a 99.9% they're a vowel.

    Cheers!