chipmunk vocals..

ThePapa

Suffragette City..
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#3
So why does 'your love has taken me over' take 2 bars to sing chipmunk or normal style?






Big props to Nicky Allen for upping it btw.
 
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#6
lol. how constructive. :)

...even though i just noticed than my comment was even less constructive. and the time Papa Jaro spends reading through this shit post could, or rather should be used more efficiently, for example to discover the depths and the origins of the production of chipmunk vocals, so STOP READING NOW!!!!
 
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ARTFX

Artist, sound designer and tutor
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#8
No they pitch the sample upwards just like said above. Most DAW's can do this, which program are you using?
 

ThePapa

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#13
Frequency is an objective, scientific concept, whereas pitch is subjective. Sound waves themselves do not have pitch, and their oscillations can be measured to obtain a frequency. It takes a human brain to map the internal quality of pitch.
What do you mean by definition? I always thought that 'pitch = frequency' but then I read this on wiki and I now I have no idea what's going on.
 

lostnthesound

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#17
What do you mean by definition? I always thought that 'pitch = frequency' but then I read this on wiki and I now I have no idea what's going on.
When we speak of pitch or frequency, we're referring to cycles (or "vibrations) per second.



Above is a set of basic sinewaves.

Notice how wide and distant the curves (cycles) are in the red waveform. This could reflect a sub bass tone, as it's low in frequency and therefore has a very slow cycle (i.e. less curves).

As we start to move down the set of waves, notice how both the amount of curves becomes greater and the distance between each one becomes tighter. This is indicative of higher frequencies; Higher frequencies = more cycles, and the audible perception of an increase in "speed".

Let's say, hypothetically, the green wave reflected a vocal. Now, if we were to "squeeze" the vocal in order to fit into a specific tempo of a song (a remix for example), what would happen? Well, the vocal would increase in "speed," because have forced the waveform to become tighter. Now, the vocal's waveform would begin to look more like the magenta waveform in the chart above. And, since that waveform contains more curves and less distance between each one, the timbre of the vocal is much higher in frequency–we've increased the cycles per second. The end result–chipmunk.

This is a quick and dirty explanation. Hope it helps a bit.

Cheers.
 
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#20
Like everyones said, just pitch it up. Most DAWs do have that. But for another way, I used to use Autotune EVO. There is a knob in it called "Transpose". You just turned the knob up, and turn the other ones down like retune speed, etc. So you don't get that annoying UhUHuhUHuhUHuhUHuhUHuhOoOoOoOOyEeAAhHhH annoying T-Pain sound. It'll just pitch it up, and it does it nicely. Well, most times. (yn)

Or, the song you're trying to remix, try to find the original, look at where it stretches too. Use the midi doing that if you can, and if it's like.. I don't know.. 51 bars in 90bpm, get rid of the midi, turn the song up to 140 or 170, etc. And just stretch it back down to 51 bars where it originally was. That should "chipmunk" it, because you've stretched it shorter on a higher bpm, the pitch will go up. And just go to the sample and pitch it up more if you're not happy with it.

Hope that helps.
 
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