Chain Compression

Discussion in 'Production' started by dirty ricky, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. dirty ricky

    dirty ricky Custom User Title

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    Does anyone here know anything about Chain Compression and how to create it with dnb? i've been hearing a lot more tracks with this. mmm..... dance floor fodder!

    ps. reason user
     
  2. Arfeds

    Arfeds Member

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  3. SIDE CHAINING is used by alot of the big DnB producers...

    Its a dynamic effect when triggered it compresses the bass signal when assigned to the snare hit. The side chain compressor dips the bass signal allowing the snare drum to punch through the mix and main bassline - also giving the tune a swing type effect.

    Here's two tunes that are heavilly sidechained...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Check the swing feel on these too. Big tunes from a big engineer!
     
  4. motion audio

    motion audio Active Member

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    Thats a bit general, it has more than one use, thats just a common one that people try.
     
  5. I'm referring to the main use of Side Chaining in drum and bass music - hence the title of the forum, man.
     
  6. motion audio

    motion audio Active Member

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    I know mate, and yea drum and bass wise it seems about the only thing people use it for, but theres people who would read it and think thats the only thing its used for in production as a whole. Wernt gettin at ya!
     
  7. sook

    sook Member

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    a different technique i beleive
    yields better and more controled
    results is automating the volume
    on the buss used for bass whenever
    the kick and the snare hit...

    saw misanthrop doing this instead
    of sidechaining a couple of years ago...
    compression is a dynamic process...
    volume automation can acheive
    similar results in a more controlled
    manner..

    ducking the bass around 3 to 6 db FS
    for around a 32nd note
    whenever accented kick and snares
    hit allows the transients to go through
    before the bass swells back in...
    with no perceived loss of bass or
    RMS... handy trick if the track is feeling
    squashed and the transients are
    having a hard time staying punchy...

    seems time consuming... but as soon
    as you have one bar of automation done
    its a simple matter of copy and paste...
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2009
  8. ...an even simpler alternative which the Brooked Bros taught me is to chop a tiny section of your bass exactly where the kick or snare hits and then duplicate. It gives exactly the same end result. Niiiiiccce!
     
  9. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    Mistabishi did this too in his masterclass video. I guess sidechaining is just the lazy man's method! If you have a lot of different fills with drums and a lot of variation in there it becomes a real arse of a job to draw the automation.
     
  10. Its actually the other way round brother. Side Chaining is the more complex method as you have to know what your doing getting the ratios and threshold's bang on.

    Wicked habit to start getting into though as the results sound amazing. :D
     
  11. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    I guess if you purely want your kick/snare to cut through, then the volume automation method makes sense. (which I never tried, thanks Sook)
    Side chaining could be used as more of an effect on the bass line if you play round with the ratio/attack/release etc on the compression.

    I have to experiment with a bit of this, cheers boys.
     
  12. Pyrolysis

    Pyrolysis Member

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    Is side Chain compress in fruity possible and how?
    Do i need a plugin or is it already there.. ? :)
     
  13. sati

    sati Code Monkey

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    even better than that: in fruity you can add a peak controller on your kick/snare bus. then link the bassline's amplitude to the inverse signal coming your peak controller. that way you are 100% liquid

    use this technique instead, then it's on auto-pilot
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
  14. sati

    sati Code Monkey

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    bus your kick and snare to a channel
    add a peak controller to that channel, un-tick "Mute" on the peak controller so you cna hear your kick and snare.

    add a compressor to your sub-bass channel, link the compressor's threshold to the the inverse input "1-Input." of your peak controller (right click on threshhold knob, click link to controller)

    play around with the settings on your peak controller to reduce the amt of pumping.

    paaadow!
     
  15. T Leaf

    T Leaf Neighbourhood Sickhead

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    one of my favourite ways to duck the bass signal is with side chaining: [level] = 2 hi hats , [audio to duck] = bassline.

    my favourite usually is to make two muted hi hats as the [level] signal. that way you get really tight sidechaning on the bassline that you can barely notice.. but its there! :) usually i'd use a closed hat for the kick and an open hat for the snare, if it has a large tail (i still envelope the hats to control the ducking), if short tail, you can get away with a closed hat. make sure the peaks in the hihats are aligned with the peaks from the kick/snare, and boom. your done (y)