bouncing audio

Discussion in 'Production' started by kieran t, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. kieran t

    kieran t Member

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    am sure you have seen the lomax and example tutorial video on youtube and where they keep bouncing everything for further processing i understand why you would do that but what i dont get is
    when they bounce a part do they go back to the same project and delete what they have just done and add the bounced audio, or do they start new project then add all the bounced parts separately like building the tune again ????
    someone clear this up for me............please
     
  2. NorthSound

    NorthSound New Member

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    I dont know the answer to your question but what i do, is have 2/3 fl studios open so i can make all my sounds in one of them and have a master project that i piece them all together in. This is so i can go back and change the sounds if they dont fit into the mix properly.
     
  3. Attire

    Attire Last Winter

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    Err well I usually just drop it back into the project and mute the original source.
    That way I can go back to it if I need to make edits in the synth or whatever.
    Of course if you're bouncing out for CPU-saving reasons, you're gonna have to start a new project or something.
     
  4. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    this
     
  5. Rajstah Vibe

    Rajstah Vibe soundcloud.com/rajstah

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    yeah, essentially...
    By keeping muted but alive the original part, you can also try to sort out a later on needed variation on that bounced track.
    And nothing stop you from import the bounce on a new track, delete the original part to save CPU and do a "Save As..." with an alternative version of the same project.
    In that way you can work in a clean project, but if needed to recover certain sound from the old project, you can still open it and create a variation...
    Bla bla blah!
    Same shit, different workflows!
     
  6. spyre

    spyre sample all the things

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    I think you don't need to delete the original synth, but just disable it
     
  7. Nick Hammer

    Nick Hammer Member

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    I have always wanted to run multiple sessions of FL but for some reason ASIO will only give me sound for 1 session ? I thought this was just the norm

    Clearly I have ASIO setup wrong ha

    - - - Updated - - -

    I have always wanted to run multiple sessions of FL but for some reason ASIO will only give me sound for 1 session ? I thought this was just the norm

    Clearly I have ASIO setup wrong ha
     
  8. spyre

    spyre sample all the things

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    You'd have to use the ASIO full duplex driver, or not use asio at all
     
  9. usualsuspects

    usualsuspects Sippin

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    Its easier on the CPU, plus Ive had synths reset themselves before when ive opened projects. Annyoning.
     
  10. Rajstah Vibe

    Rajstah Vibe soundcloud.com/rajstah

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    Yeah, it happen quite often when using "Team Dynamic" or "Union" or "Air" warez plugs. Very annoying, but I guess it should be not complaint for something grabbed for free...
     
  11. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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    I tend to resample several times, so once I have the 1st section of audio, I'll mute the synth channel and work from there, then once I've done a second resample I'll mute the 1st audio and so on. Then if I balls it all up, I can go back to the previous audio sample. Once I'm happy with the outcome, I'll go and delete all previous audio clips. But I'll always keep the original synth in there until the end, just incase I want to edit some variants