Best samples, best way to do kicks.

Messages
44
Likes
0
#1
Right, i've had problems with kicks for so fucking long and its pissing me off. I use vengeance sample which are normally pretty decent and i EQ my low kick from about 60hz onwards and roll it off at 1000hz and then hi-pass a high one and layer that on top usually. Route it to a bus, saturate, compress bla bla. But it still doesn't sound as nice as a professional dnb kick. I find with professional tunes it's more of a soft thud then a hard punch. My kicks seem to sound a lot more clicky. Can someone please give me some advice!
 
Messages
356
Likes
20
#2
I ha that problem where they sounded really dead and lifeless. It really is a case of finding a good sample. Vengeance tend to be highly processed. You wasn't something quite dry so you can make it into what you want. Apart from that a nice EQ, boost at the sweet spot etc. sorry I can't help more.
 

lostnthesound

Burns Easily in the Sun
VIP Junglist
Messages
1,390
Likes
191
#3
I know what you're talking about. As pride in your ride said, those vengeance samples tend to be heavily processed, which can either hurt or help your production depending on what sound you're going for.

In addition to the typical layering (usually one "subby" mono kick with more low end the high, and then a nice clean kick with that subtle "click" with a heavy low cut.) I've found great success in doing the following to help the tone of your kick:

1. Cut the mud. I find a subtle wide cut anywhere between 200 and 400Hz can really add a bit of punch to the kick. However, don't over do it.

2. Most recently I've been throwing my kick into a sampler (EXS24) and then auditioning the kick at different semitones (keys).

For example, load your kick into C3, and assign the pitch range from C2 to C4. Let your track play, and try auditioning different notes. A bit of pitch alteration can really alter the kick sample in a good way sonically speaking. In fact, it has really helped me in getting my kick in tune with the bass. This way, you can play along at different pitches and listen rather than having to constantly mouse click a knob to make adjustments. Also, I would make sure to audition the kick with the mix playing–trying to "hear" a good kick outside of the mix is quite deceiving.

Cheers.
 
Messages
44
Likes
0
#4
I know what you're talking about. As pride in your ride said, those vengeance samples tend to be heavily processed, which can either hurt or help your production depending on what sound you're going for.

In addition to the typical layering (usually one "subby" mono kick with more low end the high, and then a nice clean kick with that subtle "click" with a heavy low cut.) I've found great success in doing the following to help the tone of your kick:

1. Cut the mud. I find a subtle wide cut anywhere between 200 and 400Hz can really add a bit of punch to the kick. However, don't over do it.

2. Most recently I've been throwing my kick into a sampler (EXS24) and then auditioning the kick at different semitones (keys).

For example, load your kick into C3, and assign the pitch range from C2 to C4. Let your track play, and try auditioning different notes. A bit of pitch alteration can really alter the kick sample in a good way sonically speaking. In fact, it has really helped me in getting my kick in tune with the bass. This way, you can play along at different pitches and listen rather than having to constantly mouse click a knob to make adjustments. Also, I would make sure to audition the kick with the mix playing–trying to "hear" a good kick outside of the mix is quite deceiving.

Cheers.
Ok, cheers for the advice! On your subby kick, where do you usually low-pass till? The same with your clicky kick aswell...
 

lostnthesound

Burns Easily in the Sun
VIP Junglist
Messages
1,390
Likes
191
#5
It really depends on the key of the track. Take a look at this chart for reference.

With my sub kick, I tend to apply a smooth cut between 75 and 100, again, depending on the key of the track. Some people prefer a harsh cut because it can add a bit of resonance to the kick, but that's not really my style.

With the "clicky" kick, at the very least I'll cut everything below 900Hz, sometimes a bit more. Then, when sending the two kicks to a bus, I'l turn the "click" kick all the way down and slowly raise it. I want to be able to just barely hear it as it comes through the mix. The reason is that if you turn up the "click" kick too much, when you go to throw a compressor/saturator/etc. on the kick bus, it's going to really muck things up. I'm a big fan of subtlety, though there is a time and place to be aggressive, but I digress.

Finally, one thing I always do is after I've got a very rough drum kit made, I'll bounce it down and listen to it in my car so I can hear how all the sounds are coming together...and most importantly, how that kick is feeling.

Perhaps the best tip I can offer is that the best sound comes down to having quality samples to begin with. As it's been repeated many times on the forum: you can't polish a turn. If you're not feeling that kick (either layered or separated), find another sample–it will save you time and a bit of sanity. :) I've had less than good luck with some Vengeance packs–that's not to say there isn't some gold in there–but it requires a bit of digging.

I'd recommend the following packs for good kicks (and snares) with loads of headroom: Prime Loops Future DnB Drums, Loopmasters Loxy & Resound Artist Series and K-Tee Shogun DnB. The BHK Rough Connection Series (Vol. 3 & 4) are also quite good.

Cheers.
 
Last edited:
Messages
215
Likes
2
#10
I know it's amazing...

I wish Netsky would do a Q&A or something where he'd actually touch on some of his techniques. The kick and snare in this song are just too perfect. Not fair :(
its very simple really, hes just used the same samples over and over and hes processed them and mixed them exactly right, they are very good drums, however I like trying to do something different every tune...
 
Top