Bass Patterns - how do you guys go about doing these?

Messages
25
Likes
0
#1
I was wondering what people's thoughts were on creating baseline patterns on tunes.

I find putting the more melodic liquid/baselines together very easy - but doing something like a jump up tune tune I can never get the baseline sounding good or coherent. I try and put simple two note progressions together but they never sound particularly interesting - they also sound very weak...
 
Messages
40
Likes
4
#2
this might sound a bit odd but lately i have been singing/making the womp noises, recording them with a mic and then looking at the wav in melodyne to get my midi notes:D

other than that playing around with a piano set down an octave or too seems to get me some alright sounding jingles
 
Messages
472
Likes
13
#3
Could just be what you're doing, could be the synth. Try mixing up the notes, add breaks in the baseline and add a different bass. "I try and put simple two note progressions together" could be your problem, just add more, and more, without over doing it. Sometimes it helps too have them cut off, too. Sounds underneath, to give it a nice fuller sound, an undertoner. Sidechain it, drop it up and down, wobble that shit. Just be creative and work on it.
 

Eternaloptimist

Active Member
VIP Junglist
Messages
809
Likes
117
#4
this might sound a bit odd but lately i have been singing/making the womp noises, recording them with a mic and then looking at the wav in melodyne to get my midi notes:D

other than that playing around with a piano set down an octave or too seems to get me some alright sounding jingles
lol...wicked idea
 

Innovine

Active Member
Messages
435
Likes
27
#5
if you think about it, basically you'll be able to find an example of any pattern sounding nice. good tunes with a single long note? check. lots of short ones? check.a single short note? pitch bend at the start? pitch at the end? two notes? three? a third and a fifth, a third and a fourth, check check check. basically anything you can think of is out there i n a tune and sounding great.
 

troublemakers

Origins Unknown
Messages
233
Likes
2
#6
This depends on what genre.. The typical dubstep glitchy shit is easy, just take a bunch of different stabs, glitch em up and place them in random places lol..

Drum N Bass can go two ways, bass stabs or rolling basslines...

I do tend to hum my melody's and basslines before creating one..
 
Messages
215
Likes
18
#7
If I haven't got an idea already, I usually loop the beat hit record and jam it out for 10 minutes or so. Then go back through and see if there is anything that tickles the pickle you know.

I do this a lot with melodies too if I'm struggling.
 

troublemakers

Origins Unknown
Messages
233
Likes
2
#8
Me to, my cousin (which i produce with) likes to loop an 8 bar loop and i keep telling him to loop it atleast 32 bars and start riffing, he won't listen though. But yea, that's another good way to find a little groove.
 

lostnthesound

Burns Easily in the Sun
VIP Junglist
Messages
1,390
Likes
191
#9
I like to jam out and have my DAW record my takes for a few minutes. Then I'll go back and audition them to see what works best.

I've actually started humming a bit as well. Then I take it a step further and process the hums via Native Instrument's The Mouth--it essentially synthesizes your voice. :)
 

troublemakers

Origins Unknown
Messages
233
Likes
2
#10
But the Mouth killed music!! LOL!!

What i really need to do is utilize my phone and install a recorder app, i can't count the times ive had some sick beats come to me out of nowhere and forgot them 10 minutes later.
 
Top