Are a lot of dnb/dubstep basslines generally just one long note?

Discussion in 'Production' started by mr meh, Apr 23, 2011.

  1. mr meh

    mr meh Well-Known Member

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    probably a stupid question, but are a lot of these dnb/dubstep basslines just one long note that had lots of processing and shit done to it?

    as a lot of the basslines i hear seem to have no note movement?
     
  2. kuthoerrr89

    kuthoerrr89 Member

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    Depends on what kind of dnb/dub you are listening to. Liquid dnb and symphonic have very moving bassline and brostep is all about the bassline going mental, so that's processed alot. Hope that answers your question.
     
  3. miszt

    miszt BASSFACE Royale

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    kuthoerr89 summed it up pretty well

    the ways basslines are written, are as diverse as the dnb genre itself, but essentially you can get a pretty fat bassline with one single bass hit over 2 bars, a touch of pitch bend here and there, and fuk loads of processing, or even just a couple of filters. most arnt that simple tho, even if they sound like it
     
  4. Nautilus

    Nautilus Member

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    All depends what subgenre you look into. Dubstep is moving towards a point where the number of different instruments/pitches/wobble speeds/cut outs/etc. all determine the "quality" of the song. Dnb (in my opinion) has generally stayed pretty true in terms of bass quality. Although its a blunt, unresearched statement, I'd say about half the general genre is single long notes, and the other half is more complex. Its all about whether the artist wanted the focus to be on a driving melody, or powerful soul shaking bass.
     
  5. SafeandSound

    SafeandSound Mastering Engineer

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    I would say no. And these tend to be fairly boring tracks. I am not saying you cannot trance out on something repetitive
    but I find it takes a special skill to maintain interest with repetitive tracks in general. As I say with exception to those tracks
    that just "lock you in" a zone with a trancey repition i.e. good driving tunes.
     
  6. TetraEleven

    TetraEleven Producer/Idiot Savant

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    Depends...It can work if the bass sounds good and the wobbles fit well with the rest of the track, but obviously this won't be the case for everything.

    The track in my signature might be an example I suppose, it doesn't have a whole lot of key changes during the basslines.
     
  7. polymass

    polymass @humanowrkshop

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    @kuthoerrr89 gotta love the dutch.