An EQing question

Discussion in 'DJ's, MC's & Turntablism' started by ExplodingMan, Oct 31, 2009.

  1. ExplodingMan

    ExplodingMan Member

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    hello.

    When mixing, what is the best way to bring out punchy drums on both tracks without flooding the speakers with bass or sounding too cluttered?

    hope this makes sense. safe.
     
  2. DJ Spliff

    DJ Spliff Never Enuff Vinyl

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    You want to bring in some drums with a little bit of punch to em? Just give it a little bit of bass. Like maybe 7 O'Clock on the nob. I've asked a lot of EQ questions on here myself. It's something I've been trying to work on as well.
     
  3. motion audio

    motion audio Active Member

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    What I'd describe as "punch" will be found more in the lower mid range. Best way to look at EQ'ing (in the case of mixing) is to balance well between the 2 tracks - so as you bring in more high end on one track, roll it off on the other track. Boosting all frequencies on both tracks will usualy end up sounding crowded with little definition.

    If you want the "punch" from the drums on either track to be balanced, then try setting the mids fairly equal, but still both slightly lower than you would if it were just the one track on its own.
     
  4. dj_bmc

    dj_bmc Member

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    swear punch comes from compression? i rarely use the eq pots on my mixer to boost frequencies - afterall whoever it was who mixed the track down at the production stage eq'ed the sounds that way coz they thought that's how they sound best. i guess you'd also run the risk of triggering whatever limiter the system ur playing on has on the main output. i do, however use them to attenuate anything in the track that might conflict with the tune i'm mixing in, normally the bass and a little bit of mid.
     
  5. hazdaman100

    hazdaman100 Bum 'n Face

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    Just practise practise practise, listen to sets, then go home and see what sounds good. Switch the bass, reduce one. Be fiddler!!! And with time sucess will knock on your door
     
  6. Highway-man

    Highway-man Member

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    I completely agree with motion audio! There is no point in saying turn the dials to 7 ò clock or whatever becuase every mixers EQ`s are different so you have to listen and hear what sounds best but definately get used to keeping all the EQ`s balanced!

    When you need to crank an EQ up on a tune, instead of cranking that one up you should crank the same EQ of the other tune down! Im fully aware that this is a ridiculously hard habit to get into (especially if you are feeding up to one of your mixes) but the benefit of this is that when you take one of the tunes out you will have plenty of room to boost the levels of it up a bit so it wont sound like the mix has gone really quiet!

    I dont know if you understood that but its hard to explain without hearing it live!
     
  7. aflex

    aflex Member

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    exactly.