AK-11

Discussion in 'New Talent & Track Reviews' started by DP75, Oct 4, 2014.

  1. DP75

    DP75 Member

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    I recently purchased a Waldorf MicroWave (Rev B, CEM 3387, OS 2.0) and instantly fell in love with it, up to the extent I recorded a track using the MW as the only instrument (drums aside):



    Best,
    DP
     
  2. armelqb

    armelqb Member

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    Nice job dude. What is the Waldof Microwave exactly?
     
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  3. DP75

    DP75 Member

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    Thank you! ;)

    The MicroWave is a famous German synthesizer. The following is an extract from VintageSynth website.
    Looking back at the 1980's, one standout German synthesizer manufacturer was undoubtedly PPG (Palm Products GmbH), fueled by the technology in its wavetable based synthesizer, the Wave 2.x series. But like most vintage synth makers, the company was fading. Towards the end of the 1980's, PPG's technology and several of their employees joined Waldorf, another German manufacturer, and the first product to come out of this collaboration was the Microwave, released in 1989.The Microwave was built upon what was the PPG Wave. A digital/analog hybrid in which digitally sampled wavetables are processed through analog VCA envelope and VCF (filter) sections producing a classic and warm yet highly complex sound. In fact, the Microwave uses the same wavetables from the PPG Wave 2.3! In effect, the Microwave sounds like the PPG, which in turn, sounds like synth-pioneers Tangerine Dream. To lower production costs and simultaneously attempt to make it more accessible to more musicians, the Microwave was packaged in a two-unit rack module. It's a powerful instrument in a small and unassuming package.

    DP75