Acoustic treatment?

Discussion in 'Production' started by mr meh, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. mr meh

    mr meh Well-Known Member

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  2. Phoreeses

    Phoreeses New Member

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    Those foam tiles will do something for reflections of high frequency sound, so definitely worth having some of those strategically placed in your room, but not heaps as you can over do it. In the end the thing most people really need is bass traps, which can be expensive (or you can DIY http://www.readyacoustics.com/DIY-BASS-TRAPS-MADE-EASY.pdf). I've read that the ones in packs like the one you linked do sweet FA.

    Plenty of resources around on this stuff, I found the book Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio by Mike Senior to be a pretty good one. Should be able to find it online somewhere as a pdf.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I realise I didn't really answer the question. I'd buy that kit because the price is good, I think I payed nearly that much for the 6 foam panels I have in my room. It's a good start.
     
  3. changerltd

    changerltd Member

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    do a bit of research into acoustic treatment before you take the plunge. there's plenty of really good videos on youtube on the subject. also checkout the gearslutz forum for help. those guys are pretty on it with regard to acoustic treatment
     
  4. Know One

    Know One Living A Lie

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    I've been thinking of doing some minimal treatment myself. My room is really small, and has some strange shapes and Windows in it. Not to mention record shells and other obstacles. I know that throwing some traps in the corners are supposed to help. One of the main issues I gave is that "boomyness" sound my KRK Rokit 8's put off. Obviously, some better monitors would be the best solution, but funds for that are not available.

    Would some bass traps directly behind the speakers on the wall assist with killing or minimalize this boom effect at all? Or is is coming from another area? I've never done any room treatment before, so I'm kinda lost in this area myself.

    :: sent from android with tapatalk ::
     
  5. Phoreeses

    Phoreeses New Member

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    Can't comment on the bass traps, all I know is more is better. Like changerltd said, gearslutz is a good place to look. One thing worth doing first is spending an hour moving your speakers and listening position around in the room, it can significantly reduce boominess getting speakers away from walls and corners.
     
  6. Innovine

    Innovine Active Member

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    Not sure about the boomyness, but put on something with lots of low end and walk around the room. Do you notice lots of bass in some spots, and almost none in others? If so, bass traps behind the speakers are a good idea. And at the other end of the room aswell. I second the Mixing Secrets book. Read it.
     
  7. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    What you need is some math, a behringer ECM-8000 and RoomEQWizard.
     
  8. Xujih

    Xujih New Member

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    To the guy asking about bass traps, I have mine in the corners of the room as well as one in the center of the roof. Further my sub is sitting on foam as are my monitors, makes a big difference to resonance that is directly in your sound stage rather than behind you. I wouldn't necessarily put foam directly behind the sub where the output is because you will change the tone. Instead change the placement of your sub, so that either its port is facing forwards instead of at the wall, or the reverse if you want a duller sound.

    To the OP - yes that kit will help, but it isn't super great. It will come down to placements and I would suggest buying bigger bass traps in the future depending on your rig.
     
  9. SubMix

    SubMix Mastering Engineer

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    Read up, plan, and plot. Don't just buy a 'kit' because they sell it as one, each room is different and has different needs. How big is the room? What shape is it? How much furniture (often furniture does the job of bass traps - Or makes things worse). Early reflection points are generally the first thing you will treat with some simple foam diffusers. Then the same directly above the listening position. Diffusion on the wall between eh speakers can help, but directly behind them is fairly pointless.

    Is your listing position roughly 33%-ish into the room. Avoid your chair being in the middle of a room? Are your speakers and you creating an equilateral triangle? A well placed listening station and correct speaker placement will often do more for you than treatment in the first instance!

    Bass traps are often a game changer, but also more expensive, and typically, high end reflections are more important in the first instance (and easier to treat). Measuring your room as mentioned above using software can help decide were to place traps, but overall you want to treat as many corners as you can. Bear in mind though that a room has LOTS of corners (not just where wall meets wall, but where wall meets ceiling and floor as well), so a square box room has 12 long corner sections which are possible to treat (that that you need to). Walking around while playing music you know to see where the build ups are will help.

    Here is a great article about speaker placement and room treatment - http://realtraps.com/art_room-setup.htm
     
  10. Interruptor

    Interruptor Member

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    Room EQ Wizard + rockwool. Foam only affects higher frequencies, if you want to really tighten/flatten your low-end response then basicly (in most cases) you would want to make corner bass traps from floor to roof. If done DIY, a pack of 10cm thick wool is 40-50 euro + wood materials needed + molton or fibre fabric stuff as a cover.

    I myself only have a single rockwool piece treatment block behind my monitor stands, and some foam in the back wall to dampen the high end response - I have a furious low end rumble going on under 100hz which makes mixing bass basicly impossible.

    Gearslutz indeed is your friend here. Good luck and have fun treating :)


    edit: also yeah, big couches do work as basstraps. Overall I'd first treat bass freqs because they have the most energy in them = the most work to be done
     
  11. Know One

    Know One Living A Lie

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    I think that's what's happening to me as well. Cheap speakers is part of it for me (rokit 8's), I think the room is the other part.

    I've got my speakers sitting on foam pads. I think I need to try and pull my desk even farther away from the wall and see if it helps some. My room is ugly as can be... Three of the 4 walls have windows in them, all different sizes.

    Am at the point were some nice headphones might be my best option.
     
  12. SubMix

    SubMix Mastering Engineer

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    Bass trap the corners! Thats how you are going to trap that low rumble.
     
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  13. Interruptor

    Interruptor Member

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    That does help indeed but if you are having static waves (I dont know the term in english - the idea is that your room is exactly the length of a, say, 70hz wave so it reflects back and multiplies = you end up with a huge 140hz boost and are unable to hear the 70hz because masking) then wool is the only real thing that helps. I have the same problem, I cant sacrifice my room completely for music making purposes at this point, so... I have a pair of Genelec 8020s that sound great until 150hz lol and the low-end checking I do with headphones. I do study music technology at school though so I can check my mixes here, which helps hugely of course. Big genelecs, properly treated rooms etc.

    Have to say, a sound engineer friend of mine mixes all of his albums on Rokit 6s and he has one of the best sounding rooms ever. A huge load of wool lol.