Access Virus TI2 Keyboard

Skuff

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#1
Anyone with any experience with these? Looking to get my first bit of hardware, and one has come up at a good price (£1200 to be precise) And could possibly knock it down a touch more (he wanted £1700 the other day, but has had no interest by looks of things)

Really tempted, but still a fair bit of wedge to lay out, so want to be 100% on it.
 

Verva

Verva Music
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#3
Ive got a virus c. Dont use it much. Its more a bit of fun, if youve got massive or any decent software synth you can get all the sounds. If I were making money off of music i might get one. Though I did have a go on one and it does sound fat. On my c if you start cranking up the built in eq, its proper analogue sounding. Didnt hazard use to use one?
 

djdizzy

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#4
no replies yet? i'll try to make this thorough then. i bought a virus ti snow a year and a half ago and loved it but i came across a used polar for $1100, so i bought the polar and sold the snow. i really wanted to knobs and keys, it's keys feel great and it's usb so it acts as a great midi controller.

you'll probably read 2 polarized viewpoints on opinions of the virus:
1) virus owners absolutely love it's capabilities and sound, a vst could never rival it
2) people who say the virus can't do anything a vst can't also do and that vst's these days have come a long way and sound just as good

my opinion falls into category #1. i have alot of vst's but the virus is my "desert island" synth, it's my workhorse without a doubt. it's has tons of modulation capabilties, it's just shy of serum and massive but the virus sounds far better, it's not even a contest... in my opinion. as to whether you should get one or not, it depends on whether or not you like it's sound. i always give the same advice whenever somebody is asking about a synth, it just depends on your preferred style of music and whether the synth in question has the sound you're looking for. i have fm, wavetable and analog-modeled vst's but i got a virus anyway because i love its sound. to my ears, it sounds way better than vst synths. speaking of vst, the virus control vst is really well laid out and it becomes like 2nd nature very quickly. having said that, there are alot of "tricks" and hidden abilities in the virus that most people don't realize because they don't go deep enough. the virus ti is a very straight-forward synth but it can also be incredibly deep if you go that far, there are techniques that you can exploit like recursive modulation, lfo cross-modulation, there's alot of tricks and when you start using different lfo contours it opens up alot of possibilities. i've realized that there are so many presets for the virus that alot of people just go preset-diving and never go very deep with programming it.

if you end up getting a virus, send me a pm and i can give you some video training courses if you're interested. aiyn zahev has a channel on youtube where he demos the basic features of the virus, this will help give you an idea of what it sounds like raw:

raw oscillators - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1bMHXYYLNw
hypersaw oscillators - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKRON5sPiI4
wavetable oscillators - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O02F8pczISk
formant oscillators - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVMlYgeUtDc

the wavetable is great for ambient and some of them are great at lower octaves for midrange basses. unfortunately i don't think he demos all the sections like the fx or oscillators like wavetable pwm and granular or the 60-something additional waveforms in the simple oscillator section which are great for aggressive midrange basses. it can do some simplified/limited fm and phase modulation too which depending on the waveform, gives some interesting tonality. i like automating the fm on midrange basses or just leaving it at a static setting to give different tonality to a common type of sound.

- - - Updated - - -

Ive got a virus c. Dont use it much. Its more a bit of fun, if youve got massive or any decent software synth you can get all the sounds. If I were making money off of music i might get one. Though I did have a go on one and it does sound fat. On my c if you start cranking up the built in eq, its proper analogue sounding. Didnt hazard use to use one?
i took too long typing out the post, i'm not the first reply anymore lol. maybe i misread your post but massive doesn't sound anything like a virus. their wavetables are way different than one another, unless you're referring to the standard sine/square/saw/triangle waveforms? a virus' wavetables are more like a blofeld but even their sine/square/etc waveforms don't sound alike either though. whether or not a virus is right for OP is something only the OP can decide though.
 
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Skuff

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#5
I've always liked the old analogue sound, and just feel like getting more hands on now. That's a great reply btw, nice one :)

Been reading up and looking at vids over last few days, and gotta say I'm pretty much sold now
 

wingz

everyones fav austrian
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#7
Ive got a virus c. Dont use it much. Its more a bit of fun, if youve got massive or any decent software synth you can get all the sounds. If I were making money off of music i might get one. Though I did have a go on one and it does sound fat. On my c if you start cranking up the built in eq, its proper analogue sounding. Didnt hazard use to use one?
are you nuts? i'd kill for one of those

the likes of break and misanthrop use this one frequently
 
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#9
i had this one
but i traded it in for this one.... the white out limited edition.
I love them both but the ti just a bit more. Weird i just noticed the ti image is reversed for some reason.
 
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