Drum & Bass [Ableton] Low Volume Mastering

Discussion in 'Production' started by IronPuddinG, Nov 13, 2013.

  1. IronPuddinG

    IronPuddinG New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey everyone,

    So I need some help. I've been told that mastering my track by individually changing the volume levels of my instruments before I enter the 'true' mastering stage would be easier and more beneficial for the song as a whole. However, now my mix is too quiet! Short of simply raising the volume, how can I 'fix' this? I don't really want to raise the volume because I feel like there's a nice dynamic with it the way it is.

    Any advice?
    -IP
     
  2. RUSSLA

    RUSSLA DNBF Monarch

    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Messages:
    6,259
    Likes Received:
    885
    Location:
    BH1
    Limiter.. easy
     
  3. Dark Lizardro

    Dark Lizardro The Lizard that has a hammer Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    Messages:
    4,089
    Likes Received:
    887
    Location:
    São Paulo, Brazil
    If I didn't get anything wrong, what you're saying you're doing is the mixing, per se. It will be quieter, since you are leaving that 3-6db for a "engineer" to work on, right? Anyways, this will be fixed on the mastering stage, where this "engineer" (or even you) will apply some compression and raise the overall volume of the track after that.
     
    Sovereign likes this.
  4. Sovereign

    Sovereign Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2013
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    United States
    Yeah you're pretty much talking about mixing. As I'm working on a track I set the levels of things so that ultimately the mix winds up sitting around -6db, so while I'm working on a track/mixing I turn my monitors up by 6db so I perceive things as being about how loud they'll be but digitally they're actually lower; if that makes sense. Then when I do a rough master I turn my monitors down by 6db and work from there to get it where I want it. Basically I turn the monitors up so I don't have to listen to shit at a low volume which used to cause me to unconsciously push things too hard just so I could hear them at a decent level which lead to mixes that were too hot/had no headroom.
     
  5. BassGorilla.com

    BassGorilla.com Founder BassGorilla.com

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    When you do the mixdown in your first Ableton project, set the levels so that the master channel is peaking somewhere between -5 and -3 dBFS.

    Your drums group may be as low as -8 or -10 dB, your bass may be as low as -14 dB for example.

    Next, export the stems of these groups of sounds (all your drums, all your basses, all your treble synths, etc.) and put them into a new project.

    This will be your mastering project.

    I wrote up this post and made this video explaining it. You can follow these 9 steps to master your own music. Hope it helps you!

    http://bassgorilla.com/ableton-live-mastering-tutorial/

    Cheers