A question about bass

Discussion in 'Production' started by Cat Gas, Aug 4, 2010.

  1. Cat Gas

    Cat Gas Aka Basis

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    Because when you do bass, it sits in different ranges of the frequency scale and is therefore easier to hear if you were to play a G than an E for example, is there a way to make the loudness of each note more or less similar?
    Because it puts limitations on your bass if you want to change keys alot :\

    Also while I'm at it, I have a problem with my sub bass, I'm doing a track where the sub is pretty much the main bass, but I need it to be thicker, and heavier basically. I can get the tones and stuff all fine, but I need to somehow get it to be properly weighted and heavy. Making it louder doesn't really do anything :\ Any help? Also I don't think it's my listening conditions as if I play a track off youtube with the desired effect etc, it sounds fine.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2010
  2. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    Bass should be pretty much the same loudness whether its a E or a G note. Most of that difference will come from either your room setup (some bass notes sound ridiculously loud and some can barely be heard) or your filter settings. If you have a relatively low cutoff, you'll lose power on the higher notes. Then again if you go too low, you cant hear the sub proper because of speaker limitations. Or simply test things with good headphones.

    A nice way to test which it is is to keep an eye out for the bass channel meter. If the metering stays the same on these "more powerful" notes as on the weaker notes then your room is to blame. Move the speakers around or look up bass trapping.

    And if you only have a sub that is the main bass in the tune, you can try to layer it with another one just like it, but an octave higher and maybe a little quieter.

    I seem to be repeating myself a lot on this issue but I think it did a world of good for me. I dont have any bass traps in my room but calculating the speaker positions and changing them around a bit did wonders for me.
     
  3. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    For thicker and heavier you can limit it by 5-6db, see if that gets closer to what you need. (or compress instead of limit)
     
  4. Gloxxy

    Gloxxy I SNORT COAL

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    To get a really thick heavy sub just use saturation then low pass it. Resample, saturate then low pass. Repeat until you get what you need.
     
  5. dexter

    dexter Member

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    roadrunner, try the hip hop sub bass patch in operator, its soo thick, just play it an octave higher than you normally would cause its pitched down.