Splitting bass frequencies

Discussion in 'Production' started by Mr Fletch, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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    So over the last few month's I've been reading alot about the benefits of splitting up your basses into 2 or 3 seperate channels. To help with EQ, modulation etc etc.

    What I want to ask is this;
    How is the best way to go about this in FL? Would it be right to have pattern 1, with 3 instances of (for example) Albino3 running, on seperate mixer channels?

    Or do you send the 1 instance of Albino3 to 3 seperate channels (and if so, how do you do this?)

    Or am I just a complete fuckin noob spouting a load of old dribble, who hasnt got a clue and should just give up now?
     
  2. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    I usually only split mid bass to 2 places, so there's no need for duplicate VSTi's. I have a sub layer coming from a different synth. Usually anyway, sometimes it needs a different approach, like if your mid sound does have a cool sub that you dont want to cut out for example.

    On your fx channel, insert 1 should be a 'Fruity Send' to one of the 'real' sends, let's say Send 1. After that fx you can put an EQ or a filter on the fh channel 1 and let's say cut everything above 200Hz with a steep cut. Then on the Send 1 channel (that has the same soundcoming into it than before the eq on channel 1) you put an EQ that cuts below 200Hz, adjust to taste. If you want a third layer, insert another Fruity Send before the fx channel EQ, and treat that as the highs.

    You can do this with a regular channel send (select ch -> r-klik on another channel's bottom -> send to this track) as well if you set the sends as pre-fader pre-fx. It's somewhere there on the channel where you have the detailed panning controls, stereo separation etc. can't remember where exactly but it's there. I'm just used to working with the "real" sends, though it gets crowded quickly since there are only 4 of them and I like to have a sort of a dub send pair too, with a big delay and a big verb on the other. It's cool to just suddenly send a snare hit to a big verb on the brink of a drop or whatever, or sending a 'roll' part of a break to a dubby delay for a fill.
     
  3. groelle

    groelle Well-Known Member

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    i usually just route to a channel and from then on two 2 or more channels with eqs on and after everythings done i route them together for a final compression/distortion.
    dont like to use the "real" sends, as you cant route them together afterwards.
     
  4. Shmadow

    Shmadow New Member

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  5. ARTFX

    ARTFX www.artfx-studios.com

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    Just send your bass/synth VSTi to let's say mixer channel one. then if you go to the mixer and select channel 1, you can see a little rotary knob appear on the bottom of the master channel.
    Beneath that rotary button is an highlighted yellow knob in the shape of an arrow, this means that channel one is sended to the master channel.
    So if we click that yellow arrow it turns off, now we click the not highlighted arrows of channel 2, 3 and 4 while channel one is selected.
    Now you have send channel 1 to three different channels, then I usually start lowpassing and highpassing or EQ (depends what way you like more) to make the frequency bands.
    The final thing to do is to send the channels 2, 3 and 4 to channel 5 by selecting those channels one by one and clicking the arrow at the bottom of channel 5 so it turns yellow.

    Channel 1 will be the main channel your bass is sended t, I usually use that one to filter out the sub frequencies.
    Channel 2 will be the LOW end from the bass.
    Channel 3 will be the MID range of the bass.
    Channel 4 will be the HIGH end crunch of the bass.
    and at last channel 5 will be the channel to 'glue' everything back together with some compression.

    Don't forget to turn of the little yellow arrow under the master channel for the mixer channels 2, 3 and 4 or else they be send to channel 5 AND to the master, resulting in an massive amplitude and fucked up ears.

    Hope that was useful to you, mate!
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2010
  6. RevTech

    RevTech Butthole=output transduce

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    Any way to keep from duplicating tracks in cubase? I mean I use audio for my basses mainly because of resampling but you know
     
  7. groelle

    groelle Well-Known Member

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    if you use audio, why shouldnt you duplicate the tracks?!
     
  8. RevTech

    RevTech Butthole=output transduce

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    Incase I use vsts, it's not really an urgent question in any way.
     
  9. Mr Fletch

    Mr Fletch aka KRONIX

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    Cheers for the help guys, I'm understanding it a bit more now.
     

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